Quantitative Social Sciences

  1. Read through your core modules to get an understanding of what you will learn and the research methods you’ll be applying to your subject choices.
  2. Explore the pathway that you’re interested in. Your choices are –
    Geography, Urban Studies and Landscape
    Politics, Sociology and Criminology
    Management
  3. Note whether there are any mandatory modules in your pathway
    Explore the level 1 modules within your subject choices
    Explore a third subject module or an open choice module for your final level 1 module.

Top tip

Start at level 3 and work back to level 1 through the pre-requisite modules. Use the expanding subject boxes to guide your choices. Law modules are offered at different levels

Your Core Modules

These modules are compulsory and will give you an understanding of what you will learn and the research methods you’ll be applying to your subject choices.

This `zero credit’ module is designed to support you as you progress though Year 1 of their Applied Social Sciences degree at the University of Sheffield. Following a planned programme of individual and group tutorials, it will offer you professional and peer support as you experience the University of Sheffield for the first time, as well as providing you with the individual guidance necessary to ensure you navigate the programme to your own specific needs and interests. In doing so, the module will help to create a solid foundation for distinct community of learning that will help to sustain you throughout the course of your degree at Sheffield.

This modules provides you with training in, and hands-on experience of, introductory quantitative data analysis techniques for social scientists. You are introduced to descriptive statistics, data distributions, commonly encountered mathematical functions, principles of hypothesis testing, principles of statistical inference, and methods for testing bivariate relationships. The course includes hands-on experience of some commonly used statistical methods.

This module consists of three key elements. The first is principles of good graphic design, combined with how figures can be used to lie and mislead. The second is learning how to make a wide range of graphs, maps, and figures, for a wide range of different audiences, using the latest and most powerful software. The third is interpreting visual representations of data, whether from other sources or by your fellow students on the module, and using them to answer substantive research questions. Fundamentally, this is a hands-on module that allows you to make and understand data visualisations.

Surveys are commonly used by government, business and international organisations to measure what people think, what they do or plan to do. Yet, bad survey design choices can bring misleading results and unreliable estimations. This module will improve your understanding of the art of asking survey questions and the science underpinning survey data collection. Specifically, you will learn how to design an effective questionnaire, draw a sample, organise your fieldwork and analyse the results you find. You will use online survey software to practice your skills.

This unit introduces you to the skills required for the effective design, execution and communication of a social science research project utilising quantitative methods. You will construct your own research project aimed at answering a particular problem in social science, will identify, obtain and analyse the data necessary to answer that question, and will present your findings both on a written project report and in a poster paper to be presented at a student conference.

The module is designed to provide you with a solid grounding in the proper application of multivariate data analysis methods, and an appreciation of your role in the study of contemporary society. This is achieved through a combination of lectures, practical classes and seminars which cover the underlying ideas, provide hands-on experience and give examples of the methods’ application in the research and policy literature. The module covers methods including multivariate regression, logistic regression, and classification methods.

This module gives you experience in conducting a social science research project employing quantitative methods, and provides training in the design and preparation of a viable independent quantitative social science research project. It discusses how to refine a research idea, how to decide on the appropriate choice of data and methods to analyse research questions, how to plan and conduct the research process to ensure the successful completion of a project (emphasising issues of ethics, timing and resourcing), and how to present research plans and results effectively.

This module requires the you to prepare, organise, research and report a piece of original work on a social science topic. You will decide on the topic and will either be expected to collect original material in order to investigate it, or to perform secondary analysis on information drawn from existing source (and in both cases using quantitative methods to analyse the data). The finished product is presented in the style, and at the length, associated with academic journal articles.

This module is focused on students preparing and presenting a body of work in various forms, and to various audiences. The aim of the unit is to develop your ability to disseminate the findings of your Year 3 dissertation/independent project to both specialist and non-specialist audience, and in a variety of written and verbal forms. This will culminate in a conference towards the end of the year.

Your Optional Modules

 

SMI102 – Economy, Society and Public Policy

Click on the pathway that you’re interested in to view available modules and their module description.

Mandatory modules

GEO167 Geospatial Technologies (credits: 10)

Introducing and providing hands-on experience in geospatial technologies and data (involving: remote sensing, GIS, GPS) that have changed the way businesses and policy makers solve problems and the way scientists understand the dynamics of the earth system. (credits: 10) (assessment: Coursework)

Choose 30 credits from:

The first part of this module describes the main elements and key issues involved in the global economic system. In the second part the uneven development process within the global economy is examined. In the third part it is shown how economic activities at the local level are similarly moulded by global influences.

(credits: 10) (assessment: Formal exam)

An introduction to social and cultural geography focusing on a range of key concepts, current debates and contemporary issues. This module outlines current geographical thinking about space and place; culture and nature; and social exclusion, exploring conflicting conceptions of our place in nature/culture.

(credits: 10) (assessment: Formal exam)

This module provides an introduction to the use of qualitative methodologies within human geography, and students are introduced to the core qualitative techniques of in depth interviewing and observation, and to visual methodologies.

(credits: 10) (assessment: Coursework)

This module provides students with a challenging but accessible insight into the cutting edge of contemporary geographical research and how it helps us understand our changing world. It provides an opportunity to see the difference that a geographical perspective can make to our understanding of some of the largest challenges facing the world.

(credits: 10) (assessment: Formal exam)

This module introduces landscape and environmental planning as a means of intervening in landscape at the large scale, providing an understanding of landscape formation, change and the drivers of change, and introducing the toolkit available to landscape planners.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

This module introduces the main concepts and theories that underpin environmental policy-making, by examining the key environmental challenges facing human societies, exploring past, present and possible future responses to those challenges, and by providing students with the necessary conceptual and analytical tools.

(credits: 10) (assessment: Coursework)

This first part of this module considers a number of perspectives on the way an economy operates, with the second part examining key characteristics of the UK economy, including issues such as economic cycles, unemployment, land markets and the role of the public and voluntary sectors.

(credits: 10) (assessment: Formal exam)

The module presents an introduction to the history of urbanisation and the development of systems of town planning, including urban development in Europe up to the present day, as well as American urbanisation and the emergence of past measures to regulate urban development.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam)

This module will help develop an understanding of what a planning problem looks like and how to understand planning dilemmas in a real-life project context, and will also develop skills of analysis for urban places as well as basic design and drawing skills, and give a basic knowledge of planning tools.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

The module provides an introduction to state intervention into land and property development and to current planning law and practice. It considers land-use patterns, the development of state machinery in the 19th century, the British planning system and finally its application to matters of current concern.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam)

Choose from Section 1 or from Section 2.

Mandatory modules

GEO210 Geographic Information Systems (credits: 10)

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are computer systems for the storage, display and manipulation of geographical data. This module is an introduction to such systems for those with no previous knowledge of them. The module will cover the main concepts related to handling geographical data on a computer and introduce a range of practical applications of GIS in research, industry and commerce. Students interested in this module, who have not taken GEO153 (the prerequisite) but who believe they have equivalent knowledge, should contact the department. (credits: 10) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

Choose 50 credits from:

This module introduces students to key theoretical debates within human geography, and to a wider body of theory from the social sciences and humanities, which speaks to human geography. The aim is to deepen and enrich the ways in which students are able to think about geographical issues, through an understanding of concepts and approaches that underpin the substance and methods of contemporary human geography.

(credits: 10) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

To take this module you must take GEO112 at level 1

This module builds on GEO112 – ‘Introducing Social and Cultural Geographies’. The module is divided into three complementary sections corresponding to three key thematic/conceptual areas in contemporary social and cultural geographic study: 1) Culture: landscape, nature; 2) Identity: Discourse, Practice; 3) Memory: space, history. The module will enhance the understanding , critical awareness, and interdisciplinary capacities of students. The module is delivered through lectures and a variety of media engagements. The module will be assessed via essays and exam.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

To take this module you must take GEO103 or GEO112 at level 1

The module introduces students to contemporary debates within political geography. Political processes are discussed at a variety of spatial scales, from international politics, through national politics, local and community politics and individual political behaviour. Questions of power, efficacy and conflict are examined at all these scales. Particular emphasis is given to spatial and place-specific aspects of politics. Among the issues normally discussed in the module are: geopolitics and international relations; the state and territoriality; the politics of nationalism and citizenship; welfare regimes and the geography of public policy; civic activism; and individual political participation.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

To take this module you must take LSC119 at level 1

This module will provide the foundation for undergraduate student’ understanding about planning, designing and managing landscapes for sustainable communities, designing and managing landscapes for sustainable communities with a particular focus on the social aspects of this. Overall the aims of the module are to: – undertake an analysis of a neighbourhood area with a specific focus on the social construction of the study area; – understand who under-represented users of green and open spaces are, how they use these spaces and the barriers to their use of such spaces; – develop an understanding of theories of engaging communities in the planning, design and management of green and open spaces. To learn from some examples; – draw upon learning about who and how to engage with communities on a project with a real client; – produce a design for a specific site.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Project work)

To take this module you must take LSC119 at level 1

This module will allow student to: * Introduce students to a range of ecological survey techniques * Improve their identification skills and knowledge of UK flora and fauna * provide an opportunity for students to synthesise field data, review published science data and formulate a professional report. By the end of the unit students should be able to demonstrate the ability to: *apply basic ecological survey techniques: Phase 1 and Phase 2 habitat surveys: * understand the importance of plant, bird, badger and bat surveys, and the use of key indicators: *identify advantages/constraints of different surveying approaches: *develop field craft skills: *appraise the ecological value of a particular site: *provide a concise scientifically-documented report on the ecological value of one of the sites surveyed: *understand conservation measures and related management approaches. (credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework, field work)

This module explores the relationship between landscape, law and policy and governance at a number of different levels: from European legal and policy frameworks down to individual development sites; and in urban, rural and peri-urban contexts. Students will become aware of the impact of law and policy on landscape and vice versa, together with the role of landscape planning tools (techniques and methodologies) within the wider Town and Regional Planning framework. The module will also examine the ways in which decisions about landscape are made and how this affects development from a strategic to a site specific level.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework, group work presentation)

This module provides grounding in the theory and practice of urban design, focusing particularly on conceptual and practical issues in place-making. The module is arranged in three parts: (i) environmental issues in site planning, including energy, infrastructure, site servicing and sustainability; (ii) urban design theory and the relationship between architecture and urban design; (iii) local planning, including site planning, housing, commercial development and conservation.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

To take this module you must take TRP133 at level 1

The module explores the relationship between the activities of profit-seeking business, the use and development of land and the planning activity. It provides an elementary introduction to the economics of land and property development and explores how these pressures interact with lifestyle choices to shape the use of land and property and the implication for public planning. The first part provides a brief introduction to measuring the performance of businesses and investments. The remainder of the module looks at the use of land and property for housing, retail, leisure, employment and transport uses in `urban¿ contexts

(credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

The aims are (i) to develop knowledge and understanding of contemporary and historical urban theories and politics, (ii) to enhance critical thinking about urban issues and policy, (iii) to expand awareness of the assumptions, values and ideas underlying current theories and policies for cities, (iv) to engender awareness and critical thinking regarding equal opportunities (v) to develop knowledge regarding urban governance, urban economic change and contemporary urban social problems. The course is in two parts: Part 1 focuses on the development of urban theory, drawing on explanations of urban growth and change from the 19th C to the present; Part 2 considers the contemporary city economy, urban politics, urban social problems and equal opportunities issues.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

To take this module you must also take the level 2 module TRP210

The course explores the interrelationship between planning, design and development profitability. It considers the property market, property developers and the property development process. It also provides an introduction to the physical dimension of planning and to urban design. It considers the design process and proposals for the improvement of urban space; and factors that affect development profitability and the techniques used by developers to decide whether to pursue particular schemes. The course therefore includes coverage of: market analysis, development appraisal, development finance, the design process, the use of urban space and infrastructure design.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

Mandatory modules

TRP216 Spatial Analysis (credits: 20)

This module equips students with the knowledge, skills and experience to understand how the analysis of socio-economic datasets can be used to understand planning problems. In particular, the module focuses on the application a broad range of spatial analytical techniques to these data. Students learn how to use a Geographic Information System (GIS) to understand spatial patterns and to produce maps that effectively communicate these. (credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

Choose 40 credits from:

To take this module you must take GEO112 at level 1

This module builds on GEO112 – ‘Introducing Social and Cultural Geographies’. The module is divided into three complementary sections corresponding to three key thematic/conceptual areas in contemporary social and cultural geographic study: 1) Culture: landscape, nature; 2) Identity: Discourse, Practice; 3) Memory: space, history. The module will enhance the understanding , critical awareness, and interdisciplinary capacities of students. The module is delivered through lectures and a variety of media engagements. The module will be assessed via essays and exam.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

To take this module you must take GEO103 or GEO112 at level 1

The module introduces students to contemporary debates within political geography. Political processes are discussed at a variety of spatial scales, from international politics, through national politics, local and community politics and individual political behaviour. Questions of power, efficacy and conflict are examined at all these scales. Particular emphasis is given to spatial and place-specific aspects of politics. Among the issues normally discussed in the module are: geopolitics and international relations; the state and territoriality; the politics of nationalism and citizenship; welfare regimes and the geography of public policy; civic activism; and individual political participation.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

To take this module you must take LSC119 at level 1

This module will provide the foundation for undergraduate student’ understanding about planning, designing and managing landscapes for sustainable communities, designing and managing landscapes for sustainable communities with a particular focus on the social aspects of this. Overall the aims of the module are to: – undertake an analysis of a neighbourhood area with a specific focus on the social construction of the study area; – understand who under-represented users of green and open spaces are, how they use these spaces and the barriers to their use of such spaces; – develop an understanding of theories of engaging communities in the planning, design and management of green and open spaces. To learn from some examples; – draw upon learning about who and how to engage with communities on a project with a real client; – produce a design for a specific site.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Project work)

To take this module you must take LSC119 at level 1

This module will allow student to: * Introduce students to a range of ecological survey techniques * Improve their identification skills and knowledge of UK flora and fauna * provide an opportunity for students to synthesise field data, review published science data and formulate a professional report. By the end of the unit students should be able to demonstrate the ability to: *apply basic ecological survey techniques: Phase 1 and Phase 2 habitat surveys: * understand the importance of plant, bird, badger and bat surveys, and the use of key indicators: *identify advantages/constraints of different surveying approaches: *develop field craft skills: *appraise the ecological value of a particular site: *provide a concise scientifically-documented report on the ecological value of one of the sites surveyed: *understand conservation measures and related management approaches.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework, field work)

This module explores the relationship between landscape, law and policy and governance at a number of different levels: from European legal and policy frameworks down to individual development sites; and in urban, rural and peri-urban contexts. Students will become aware of the impact of law and policy on landscape and vice versa, together with the role of landscape planning tools (techniques and methodologies) within the wider Town and Regional Planning framework. The module will also examine the ways in which decisions about landscape are made and how this affects development from a strategic to a site specific level.

(credits: 20)

(assessment: Coursework, group work presentation)

This module provides grounding in the theory and practice of urban design, focusing particularly on conceptual and practical issues in place-making. The module is arranged in three parts: (i) environmental issues in site planning, including energy, infrastructure, site servicing and sustainability; (ii) urban design theory and the relationship between architecture and urban design; (iii) local planning, including site planning, housing, commercial development and conservation.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

To take this module you must take TRP133 at level 1

The module explores the relationship between the activities of profit-seeking business, the use and development of land and the planning activity. It provides an elementary introduction to the economics of land and property development and explores how these pressures interact with lifestyle choices to shape the use of land and property and the implication for public planning. The first part provides a brief introduction to measuring the performance of businesses and investments. The remainder of the module looks at the use of land and property for housing, retail, leisure, employment and transport uses in `urban¿ contexts

(credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

The aims are (i) to develop knowledge and understanding of contemporary and historical urban theories and politics, (ii) to enhance critical thinking about urban issues and policy, (iii) to expand awareness of the assumptions, values and ideas underlying current theories and policies for cities, (iv) to engender awareness and critical thinking regarding equal opportunities (v) to develop knowledge regarding urban governance, urban economic change and contemporary urban social problems. The course is in two parts: Part 1 focuses on the development of urban theory, drawing on explanations of urban growth and change from the 19th C to the present; Part 2 considers the contemporary city economy, urban politics, urban social problems and equal opportunities issues.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

To take this module you must take the level 2 module TRP210

The course explores the interrelationship between planning, design and development profitability. It considers the property market, property developers and the property development process. It also provides an introduction to the physical dimension of planning and to urban design. It considers the design process and proposals for the improvement of urban space; and factors that affect development profitability and the techniques used by developers to decide whether to pursue particular schemes. The course therefore includes coverage of: market analysis, development appraisal, development finance, the design process, the use of urban space and infrastructure design.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

Choose 40 credits from:

To take this module you must take GEO242 or GEO243 at level 2

A considerable number of social issues in contemporary Europe have important geographical aspects, at a number of scales. The aim of this module is to consider a number of these social issues, focusing especially on their manifestation at the local and regional scales. Particular emphasis will be placed on evidence drawn from ethnographic and vernacular sources as supplements to academic study. The topics to be considered will vary from year to year, but may include urban social geography, ethnic minority communities, housing, rural isolation, and community identities.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, project work)

To take this module you must take GEO243 at level 2

This module reviews current research on the political geography of elections, dealing with both electoral behaviour and the politics of the electoral process. The course will examine how elections contribute to the development and use of power and legitimacy in political systems. Most attention will be given to the analysis of the electoral decision: what influences voters’ choices? How does geography impact upon those choices? Contextual models of voting are discussed and attention will also be focused on the activities of political parties and of electoral systems in creating “electoral spaces”.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

To take this module you must take GEO217 or GEO221 at level 2

The aim of this module is to critically examine the development process within a global context, drawing on examples from developed and developing nations. Attention is given to the different ways in which we in the West understand ‘development’, and how we can reflect more critically on our position, and the power relations within this process. Drawing on debates within development geography, and other disciplines, the course is structured around three themes: the development industry, the poverty agenda and the local-global nexus. Topics covered include: violence and security, power and race in development aid, participation and empowerment, local forms of resistance, environmental action and change.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

To take this module you must take GEO241 plus any two of GEO217, GEO242, GEO243

The ways in which we buy and use stuff and services are inextricable from the shaping of both our everyday lives and of contemporary societies. From constructions of identity and models of human wellbeing to issues of social equality and environmental sustainability, debates around consumption illuminate critical perspectives on contemporary societies and cultures. This module explores key contemporary geographical perspectives on consumption, linking critical insights and theoretical perspectives to our own practices and experiences.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam)

Geographical Information Systems (GIS) provide increasingly important tools in the social sciences and especially in the development and monitoring of social and economic policy. This module will introduce students to some of the key data sources used for this type of analysis, such as the population census and other large government surveys. It will also introduce students to a range of techniques used for the analysis of socio-economic data, including statistical methods and microsimulation. Some of the practical and policy-related issues which arise in this type of analysis will also be considered. The course will include practical sessions using state-of-the-art software.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

To take this module you must take GEO241 and GEO265 at level 2

The links between social conflict and cultural production in modern cities have long fascinated scholars, and recent scholarship has been marked by a renewed interest in the embodied experience of these aspects of urban life as sensory perceptions, aesthetic judgments and power relations. This module will draw from cultural, social, historical and political geographies as well as other disciplines to engage with the shifting nature and spatiality of these relationships, both through theoretical debates and through case studies of selected cities. Key topics will include urbanisation, cultural difference, social stratification, representational practices and bodily experiences of modern cities.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, project work)

The aims are to (i) develop a knowledge of the legal framework for planning; (ii) develop understanding of development control procedures and policy; and (iii) develop skills in analysing development control problems. The course covers nature and purpose of development control; applications; decisions; redress; enforcement; European directives; design control; effectiveness of development control.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

This module requires the student to prepare, research and write-up a piece of work based on library resources on a planning or planning-related topic. The student will choose a topic and will be required to produce an extended essay that synthesises and develops a critique on the existing literature. The essay may or may not analyse policy. The essay will be based on a thorough review of relevant literature and the synthesis of specialised knowledge gained throughout the course.

(credits: 40) (assessment: Coursework)

This course explores the interrelationships between theoretical debates within spatial planning and everyday practice. The aim is to provide an introduction to the theoretical debates in planning with particular focus on the values and ethical dilemmas underlying spatial planning practice in Britain. It should be noted that the planning activity provides the focus for the course but that the issues and concerns are also linked to the work of other built environment professionals.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

This course gives an overview of the critical task of planning for future development. Much of this work involves making plans and strategies and there will be a focus on these activities during the course of this module. However, it is also vitally important to understand the contexts in which plans are made and implemented, and this module will seek to examine the diverse environments in which plans are made. Part of this task will be achieved through students reflecting on the contexts in which their placements were located. The module considers not only the different forms of plans in the English planning system, but also aims to critically examine some of the key issues facing planners, including organising public involvement in plan-making, seeking consensus between conflicting interests in development and the implementation of policy.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

This unit provides an overview of principal elements of contemporary environmental and nature conservation policy, and institutional frameworks for their delivery. Following an elaboration of key concepts of environmental sustainability and environmental integration, it addresses key issues in policy development and implementation, focusing on the contested and complex nature of the policy environment, and the role of the public and specific interests. The aim is to develop a critical understanding of the opportunities to integrate environmental and nature conservation concerns into policy making. Substantive content includes international and European conventions, policies and instruments; designated areas; and integration in the planning system.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

Choose 40 credits from:

This module examines the utility of the comparative approach to politics by examining executives in a number of political systems and focussing on ‘constitutional engineering’, with cases such as US presidency, Brazilian presidency and the UK prime minister.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

This module provides an introduction to key themes and thinkers in Western political thought, including the relation between human nature and politics, explored through a series of deep conflicts (reason and desire, the state and individual, the public and private).

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

This module takes an overview of the ideas and issues that have shaped understandings of globalisation, delivered through the introduction of the concepts of sovereignty and international order. Students will gain the basic analytical tools required to make sense of international affairs.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

This module provides an introduction to the theories, methods and approaches which shape political analysis, by exploring the relationship between knowledge, its validation and the methods used to collect information, in addition to the language of political analysis.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework, group project – website)

This module examines the nature of security in global politics, examining security issues such as alliances and the Cold War, as well as broader human security related conceptions such as humanitarian intervention and ‘R2P’ (right to protect), and finally migration, climate change and pandemic disease.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

This module introduces students to British politics as experienced through key leaders and events, including a ‘leadership’ theme and the study of the fluid nature of political leadership, and a ‘consensus’ theme exploring post-war consensus and its impact.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

This module introduces students to basic sociological concepts such as “the sociological imagination” and “social interaction” and illustrates how they can be applied to everyday life. A range of everyday life situations, such as shopping, mobile phone use and travel, will be used as examples.

(credits: 10) (assessment: Formal exam)

This unit explores a key concern of sociology to explain how and why material and symbolic rewards are distributed unequally, such as wealth, privilege and power. It will focus on divisions in social class, gender and race, as well as sexuality, age, religion and disability.

(credits: 10) (assessment: Formal exam)

This unit intends to address the following questions regarding gender and sexuality and their interaction with society: What do we mean by gender and sexuality? How do we do gender and sexuality? How do we see gender and sexuality? How do we control gender and sexuality?

(credits: 10) (assessment: Coursework)

In this module, sociological understandings of crime are discussed, often with reference to their implications for policy, and major research about crime in contemporary Britain is introduced.

(credits: 10) (assessment: Coursework)

This module introduces students to some of the material and theoretical concerns of social policy as well as considering collective responses to social problems in historical and contemporary context, and the effects of social change on the design and delivery of welfare policies.

(credits: 10) (assessment: Formal exam)

This module introduces foundational theories in sociology by describing the ideas of leading theorists Durkheim, Marx and Weber. Lectures will analyse the primary texts of sociological thoughts with reference to the social contexts in which they emerged, including the concerns of the first generation of sociological thinkers.

(credits: 10) (assessment: Formal exam)

This unit will take a social anthropological approach towards understanding the concept of culture and the ways in which it informs the organisation and practices of societies around the world, as well as examining the impact of social change and globalisation on different cultures.

(credits: 10) (assessment: Coursework)

Introducing criminological definitions, empirical study, theory and the development of criminal justice systems, case studies help students understand how history and theory of criminology can be brought to bear on social and legal issues.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

This module focuses on how crucial criminological topics have been investigated, and is taught by lectures and seminars/classes where students work in small groups to examine real research studies, and work out how to tackle research problems.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

This module looks at key topics in relation to responses to crime and victimisation, exploring policing and prosecution, public responses, crime prevention, restorative justice and victim support. A goal of the module will be to emphasize the interrelatedness of these topics and present them as integrated problems.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

Choose 60 credits from:

This module will provide students with a working knowledge of European integration, and of the main institutions of the European Union, including the Council of Ministers, the Commission and the Parliament. The module consists of a series of lectures on the history and institutions of the European Union, and seminars to discuss issues raised in the lectures.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

This module will begin by providing students with an account of the major theoretical traditions which seek to interpret and explain the global political economy. These are liberalism and interdependence theory; mercantilism, nationalism and hegemonic stability theory; and marxism, dependency and world systems theory. It then explores different aspects of the contemporary global political economy – finance, development, trade and production – and ends by reviewing the intellectual debate about the meaning of globalisation.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

This module provides an introduction to international relations theory. The module examines the beginnings of the Discipline and demonstrates how these origins have continued to shape contemporary international relations theory. The module then outlines hte key areas of theoretical debate, including Realism, Liberalism, Marxism, Postmodernism, Constructivism, Neorealism, Feminism and Critical Theory.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

The module focuses on the origins, impact, and political consequences of, and responses to, neoliberalism, with reference to the developing world, in particular Latin America. The theoretical focus of the module will be drawn from international political economy and political behaviour. The module will analyse responses to neoliberalism by states and alliances of states, by political parties and by social movements, using empirical case studies. It will also explore the extent to which a post-neoliberal political economy of development and linked political strategies can be discerned, and their significance.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

This module introduces students to the theories and methods of conducting comparative political analysis through an examination of democracy. The module allows students with some experience of comparative politics from Level One (POL109) to build on and deepen existing knowledge. Topics include: governance, bureaucracy, the mass media, interest groups, political parties, and electoral systems. Examples are drawn from many countries and students are encouraged to use examples from their own country, if appropriate.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

This module examines a series of key contemporary challenges to international security. It addresses debates about the changing nature of security, analyses some of the causes of conflict and the development of new security threats, and assesses some of the ways in which states seek to manage these threats. A range of approaches are examined in order to provide students with a theoretically-informed but policy-relevant understanding of security-related issues in the twenty-first century.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

This module explores changing state-society relationships across the UK, and their impact on government institutions. Traditionally, the British state has been viewed through the lens of the Westminster Model, which is top-down, power-hoarding, adversarial, exclusive, and with little emphasis on public participation. Yet changes to the fabric of the state through processes such as Europeanisation, devolution and the transformation of the public sector have challenged these assumptions. This module therefore considers where power resides within the state; how citizens interact with the state; and how the contemporary state should be understood in terms of accountability, legitimacy and governability.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

This course offers students an introduction to contemporary US foreign policy. How is foreign policy made in Washington? What are the main interest groups? What is the exact balance of power between the Presidency and Congress? How do the principal traditions of US foreign policy impact contemporary decisions? We will assess these issues and others through some of the primary challenges facing America today: including the War on Terror, climate change, and the re-emergence of a multipolar world order.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

The aim of this module is to build on and develop students’ understanding of Sociological theory, exploring its relevance to key themes and issues in contemporary society. The course will begin with an exploration of the work of modern social theorists such as Talcott Parsons and will conclude with a focus on contemporary theorists such as Donna Haraway. In order to foster student understanding of social theory, its aims and purposes, each theorists work will be applied to substantive issues in modern and contemporary society such as family formation, urbanisation, politics, and globalization. Overall, the module aims to provide students with a critical understanding of the importance and use of modern and contemporary social theory.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

This module locates UK social policy within a wider international context drawing on comparative perspectives in the analysis of some of the key concepts and themes in social policy, and the exploration of core policy areas and current issues. It provides breadth of study in considering the nature of social problems, the operation of social divisions and the role of the state and other agencies of welfare in responding to these and a range of other social issues in countries around the world. The module also examines the theoretical frameworks which inform comparisons of welfare states and the contribution and limitations of comparative study in relation to the wider analysis of social policy.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, assessed presentation)

The module explores the meaning of race in various social and political contexts. It examines how ideas about race help to shape and determine social and political relations and includes considering the part played by ideas about race in forming notions of self and other at the micro and macro levels. It also explores the role of race as a major source of social divisions and aims to show the significance of racism to the reproduction of structural inequalities. Themes explored include theories of racism, multiculturalism, Muslims, racialised identities, immigration, education and criminal justice.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

Using a sociological and anthropological perspective this unit seeks to problematise the concept of `family’ as a natural and universal phenomenon. Rather, it underscores the need to explore the notion of the family as a social and historical construction and will achieve that by examining the diversity of family life in countries around the world. While acknowledging the impact of social change on different family constructions, it will also seek to show how some family structures remain the same, creating a situation where one society can have multiple family structures. In particular, it will focus on the role of the state in constructing the family and highlight the impact these different constructions of family life (and the changes they have undergone) have on particular individuals such as women, children and the elderly.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework, project work)

This module investigates how international factors help to shape national social policies. It will begin with an examination of the impact of world-regional bodies, such as the European Union, before extending this to international governmental institutions, including the World Bank, IMF, WTO and OECD. It also considers the impact of global business, trade union and civil society actors as well as wider economic structures.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

The unit investigates sociological analyses of the ways in which contemporary societies attempt to govern human life. How do modern societies problematise life? How do they seek to shape its course? Substantive topics include: approaches to steering population life and individual conduct; liberal and neoliberal modes of governing human life; the social management of risk; social responses to – and society’s creation of – human suffering; and collective modes of dealing with mortality. The module introduces students to the methodological aspects of the sociological study of biopower and biopolitics, explores its theoretical foundations, and examines several empirical case studies in the field.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

Crime and deviance are major features of all societies. Since the 19th Century, sociologists have developed a variety of explanations as to why individuals stray from the path of conformity. In this course, we will review the historical development of a range of theoretical approaches to the study of crime and deviancy, consider how sociologists have studied the primary institutions of social control such as the police, courts and prisons, and finally consider the contribution of the sociology of crime and deviance to issues of contemporary significance.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

Social Policy and Criminology examines responses to crime that do not rely on criminal justice responses of police, courts and prisons. Specifically, the module reviews and appraises social policy responses, including health, housing, education, employment, youth and family as a means of crime reduction. The module includes a consideration of theories of crime suggesting social policy as a response, the role of criminologists in policy making, the concept of social justice in relation to social welfare and crime, and criminalisation of social policy as an unintended outcome.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

The aim of the module is to foster a sociological understanding of the characteristics of the Internet and the social relationships in which it is embedded. The module addresses the emergence and development of the Internet in society. It covers the history of the Internet, its philosophical and technological underpinnings, and the culture, construction and meaning of the Internet. Practices of the Internet in areas such as politics, work, welfare, and the media are considered within debates about the Information Society. The way in which the Internet is gaining meaning in everyday life, within late modern culture and in the formation of identity is examined.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework, project work)

This unit critically explores the development of media studies. It incorporates classical (e.g. Adorno, Lazersfeld) and contemporary (e.g. Gauntlett, Terranova) theorists, grounding their analyses in a range of empirical areas of investigation (e.g. the music industry, media regulation). The development of key debates about media ownership, media effects and representation are used to demonstrate how the field has changed and what has remained intact over the course of its development.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

This unit will enable students to gain an understanding of the current role of professional social work in the general context of 21st century UK social care provision. It aims to provide an overview of the principal themes and issues driving current social work practice and will offer students the opportunity to consider key areas of practice specialism in greater depth. The unit will enable students to consider opportunities for employment within the field and to understand the routes to qualification.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework, group presentation)

This module is concerned with the sentencing and punishment of offenders. It considers, in historical context: the philosophical underpinnings of punishment; sentencing policy and practice; and the forms that punishment takes (including custodial and non-custodial options). It also considers what we know about public attitudes toward punishment. A key issue addressed by this module is the rapid growth of the prison population since the mid-1990s: how can we explain this state of affairs, and can/should this trend be reversed?

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam)

To take this module you must take LAW110 and LAW113 at level 1

The Criminology Research Paper requires a student to submit a research paper of 6,000 words on a criminological topic that is approved in advance by the module convenor. The aim of the module is to support a student in independently carrying out research, whether library-based or empirical. It may also enable a student to study a subject that is not otherwise covered in depth on their degree. It is the student’s responsibility to select the topic and to approach the module convenor for approval. The student may only proceed with research that a member of the criminology staff is willing to supervise. The student should approach the appropriate staff member and seek agreement for the supervision of their project before opting to undertake the research paper.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Project work)

Attempts to rehabilitate offenders have a long history and have taken a variety of forms. This module considers the legitimacy and effectiveness of approaches toward offenders which come under the umbrella of `rehabilitation¿. The module focuses in particular on contemporary rehabilitative approaches used in prisons and in the context of community penalties, including the current popularity of cognitive-behavioural treatment programmes. It also examines in detail the relevance and effectiveness of rehabilitation in respect of specific groups of offenders, such as those who commit sexual offences and drug misusing offenders.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

This module will examine various aspects of prisons and imprisonment. Part one will look at the theoretical dimensions of the prison, including the philosophies of punishment, as well as continuities and changes in the history of imprisonment. In part two, the focus will be on prisoners’ varied experiences of incarceration. Topics to be covered will include prisoner subcultures, political imprisonment, and the architecture of incarceration. The third part of the module will examine penal politics and political discourse, and the impact of the representation of the prison in popular culture. The module will conclude with an examination of penal abolitionism.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework, seminar presentations)

To take this module you must take LAW110 at level 1 or LAW382 at level 2

This module aims to develop a multidisciplinary understanding of drugs, crime and control by engaging with the key academic and policy literature. Students will explore a wide range of drug-related issues and debates, critically analyse the laws, policies and institutions of drug control, and situate them within the wider social context. The topics covered will include: the social construction of the `drug problem’; drugs and crime; historical and contemporary perspectives on drug policy; drugs policing from the global to the local; tackling drugs through criminal justice interventions; drug control across the world; and the legalisation debate and alternatives to criminalisation.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

Crime, Law and History aims to develop an understanding of historical study in criminology and socio-legal studies. Students will encounter a range of topics, including international and comparative studies, through the 19C and early 20C. The module content will cover leading approaches, such as legal history, social history, cultural history, microhistory, gender history and quantitative history. Discussions will likely include topics such as self-protection and crime prevention, British empire and prostitution, prisons and convict labour, crime and punishment in the American `Wild West’, immigrants and racialization of crime in the UK, anarchists in London, trafficking in women, African Americans and criminal justice.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

This module will introduce students to the field of environmental criminology: briefly, the study of crime, criminality and victimisation as they relate to place and space. Whilst the history of the field will be covered, much of the module will concentrate on research previously and currently being conducted within South Yorkshire.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

The module will familiarise students with the lives of those found guilty of crimes after their punishment has ended. This includes both `traditional¿ ideas of offenders and special groups of ex-prisoners such as the wrongfully convicted. Students will learn about the theoretical explanations for why some people stop offending, and about specific elements of these processes, such as the emotional trajectory of desistance and the impact of the criminal justice system on their subsequent lives.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

Cannot take this module with LAW3032

This module explores policing on a macro-level, taking into account developments on a national and global scale. The topics covered will include: conceptualizing the police and policing; key features of policing, such as police powers, discretion, police culture and accountability; models of policing; the history of policing in the UK and elsewhere; the policing of multi-ethnic communities (who can also be thought of as ‘global citizens’); the role of the police in policing, in the light of the growing involvement of non-warranted civilians and others in policing activities; policing in other countries, including post-colonial countries; and policing in a transnational context; policing in global, late modern societies. The module will be partly empirical, but it will also be grounded in theories about the use of power; for example, it will be situated within theories about governance and social control, whilst also exploring whether and from where the police derive legitimacy in exerting power/authority over citizens.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam)

Cannot take this module with LAW3021

The module looks at key topics in relation to responses to crime and victimisation. It explores policing and prosecution, public responses, crime prevention, restorative justice and victim support. To what extent are policing and public priorities for policing aligned? How does the public view the role of the authorities? How can we support victims? Are there alternative responses to crime instead of prosecution and sentencing? What are we doing to prevent crime? Do certain types of crime require particular responses? A goal of the module will be to emphasize the interrelatedness of these topics and present them as integrated problems.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

To take this module you must also take LAW353

This module extends research methods abilities developed initially in earlier research methods modules. There, students learned to manipulate and analyse data using SPSS on a computer. Here, students will work in small groups developing research ideas to form a fully developed questionnaire, which will be subsequently administered to a small general public sample via Corporate Information and Computing Systems (CICS). Thereafter, resulting data are coded, computerised and analysed, and results written up as an individual report.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

To take this module you must take LAW110 at level 1 or LAW382 at level 2 AND LAW113 at level 1 or LAW383 at level 2

This module does not assume any knowledge of the main data analysis computer package used by criminologists to examine survey data (Statistical Package for Social Scientists SPSS). Using progressively more complex data-bases based on pre-existing surveys, students are taught how to enter, clean and check data, and all commands necessary to analyse survey data (frequency, cross-tabulation, correlation, select, count, etc.).

(credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework, lab work)

This module examines the experiences and treatment of men and women as victims and criminals. It examines whether and how offending patterns vary according to gender and explores connections between gender, offending and victimisation. The module also explores the treatment of and experiences of men and women within the criminal justice system. It argues that in order best to understand crime and criminal justice, criminologists must understand both as gendered.
(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

To take this module you must take LAW110 at level 1 or LAW382 at level 2

This module examines youth crime and `antisocial behaviour, as well as formal responses to young people who offend. During the first half of the module, contemporary and historical views of youth crime are critically examined, attending particularly to class, ethnicity and gender, and to the historical construction of youth as problematic. The second half of the module focuses on youth justice, including the role of the police, the courts, Youth Offending Teams, custodial institutions and other bodies in regulating unruly youth and preventing and responding to youth crime.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

This module explores the development of restorative justice in theory and practice and seeks to understand the contemporary popularity of restorative justice as a way of responding to offending. It considers the appeal of restorative justice to a variety of stakeholders (including offenders, victims and the wide community) and in a variety of jurisdictions, including England & Wales and Northern Ireland. It also examines the effectiveness of restorative justice interventions and how this has been assessed by researchers.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam)

This module introduces students who have not taken criminology core modules to key areas of criminological definition, empirical study, theory and the development of criminal justice systems. It equips non-criminology students with a broad understanding and so enables them to take further criminology modules if they choose. The module looks at case studies of crime and deviance from contemporary life to help students understand how some of the history and theory of criminology can be brought to bear on social and legal issues.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

Criminology is notable for the considerable number of different methods of research which have been used, ranging from participant observation and anthropological methods to national surveys, such as the British Crime Survey. The module is designed to explore the use of each of the principal methods and their associated levels of theory and explanation so that students will be able to judge whether a published study is methodologically adequate and will be able to take decisions themselves about which methods should be used for which kind of problem.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

Choose 40 credits from:

This is the final year component of the skills spine in the Politics undergraduate curriculum, taken by all students. Building on the previous two skills modules, this module encourages students to draw on the broad range of the studies, to focus on the various ways in which we explain politics and political outcomes. Taking a single empirical case, a ‘big issue’ as its core, the module explores various explanations – institutional, structural, ideational, psychological – that can be used, drawing on cognate disciplines such as history, sociology, economics and psychology. Students will then apply these explanatory modes to an aspect of the core empirical case.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework, group project)

This is the final year component of the skills spine in the Politics undergraduate curriculum, taken by all students. Building on the previous two skills modules, this module encourages students to draw on the broad range of the studies, to focus on the various ways in which we explain politics and political outcomes. Taking a single empirical case, a ‘big issue’ as its core, the module explores various explanations – institutional, structural, ideational, psychological – that can be used, drawing on cognate disciplines such as history, sociology, economics and psychology. Students will then apply these explanatory modes to an aspect of the core empirical case.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework, group project)

The module aims to introduce students to the development of the philosophy of contemporary rights theory in its legal, moral and political dimensions with particular reference to areas of conflict and debate. Issues covered include natural rights, human rights, socio-legal rights, the rights of the citizen, group rights, the right to self-determination, animal rights and the right to life.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

This module focuses on the study of elections and voting behaviour. Particular emphasis will be placed on elections and voting patterns in Britain and the United States, although not exclusively so. Factors at the core of democratic legitimacy will be examined, such as why individuals vote (or do not vote) and why they vote the way they do. Topics covered will include participation, theories of voting behaviour, election campaigns and electoral systems.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

This module reviews and explores the key themes of Africa’s contemporary political economy. In doing so, it concentrates on Africa’s relationship with the global political economy, and raises questions about the nature of state action in African countries.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

With American power seemingly all powerful today, this unit provides a rethink of the origins of great power politics/economics. Mainstream Eurocentric theories in International Relations view great power politics/economics as having universal materialist properties. And they view America and Britain as hegemons that provide global public goods for the benefit of all. This module problematises this view by revealing the differing moral foundations and ‘standards of civilisation’ that inform the various directions that great power can take. It examines Britain and China in the pre-1900 era, contemporary America, Japan, and the potential role of China in the coming decades.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

This module aims to provide students with an understanding of the political, social and economic factors explaining the Cuban Revolution’s survival of the collapse of the Soviet Bloc. Against a background of analysis of Cuban nationalism and post-revolutionary development, the focus will be on achieving a critical understanding of: the impacts of the Soviet collapse and intensification of the US blockade; the nature and effects of Cuba’s strategic ‘marketisation’ and ‘opening’ to global capitalism; the evolution of political participation and civil society in Cuba; and the development of Cuba’s foreign policy.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

This module aims to provide students with an understanding of contemporary political debates on quality of life issues and their relation to philosophical traditions within and beyond the main British political parties. This includes analysis of how quality of life is defined and measured in different contexts and relates this debate to long-standing debates on poverty, social exclusion and social capital. Attention is paid to the quality of life aspects of public policies.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

This module is based on a full reading of five small (circa 150pp) but influential texts that cover core themes in modern Politics such as morality, power, and representation. Each text receives two weeks’ attention: one to review the text’s content and key arguments; and a second to discuss, interpret and evaluate. The module gives students a unique opportunity to consider key politics texts in themselves and in context. The texts are only loosely connected; the idea is not to offer an integrated set of books which constitute a genre; rather it is to provide students with access to secular modern texts on core Politics themes. (credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

This module provides an in-depth analysis of party politics. It offers a detailed exposition of the multiple issues related with parties, looking at the interactions both within and outside parties. The module covers key aspects of party politics such as the different types of parties, their organization, party membership, types of party systems, political competition and issue positioning, campaign strategies, formation of new parties, the effects of cleavages, coalition formation, party financing and the number of parties.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

This module studies war, peace and justice. It examines the causes, manifestations and changing nature of war, looking at ethnic conflict, the war on terror and the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. It examines peace, in particular focusing on peacebuilding in post-conflict situations and dealing with the psychological wounds caused by war. The third component examines the meaning of justice after conflict, at the ways at which justice is arrived at (for example though the prosecution of war criminals), and at whether justice is necessary for peace.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

This module focuses on how parliaments and legislatures operate and is founded on the basis of theoretically-informed but policy-relevant teaching. It therefore attempts to provide students with a sense of why cultures, traditions and informal relationships matter as much (if not more) than formal procedures. Although the House of Commons and the House of Lords provide the main institutional focus for this module students will be encouraged to adopt a comparative approach whenever possible and to situate their analysis within an appreciation of the changing role of parliament within evolving frameworks of multi-level governance.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

This module bridges the gap between the international political environment and domestic polity. It takes three foundational characteristics of the contemporary state – population, territory and rule – and explores each from conceptual, theoretical and historical perspectives. Its starting point is the nature of the modern state and the stresses to which it is subject that can, in certain circumstances, lead to ‘failure’. Central to the module is the rarity of ‘state death’ and the reasons for, and the consequences of, this rarity; it also considers the emergence of sub-category of states – the failed state – and what this means for our understanding of politics.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

This module looks at the way international intervention has changed in recent years. It draws on a number of different areas – humanitarian intervention, peacekeeping, development and state-building. It draws these areas together by exploring what they have in common and how there has been a shift in the way that international intervention deals with these issues. In particular, the international community has moved from direct involvement towards a form of governance that operates from a distance by encouraging local ownership, capacity building and resilience.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

In today’s globalized world, infectious diseases and other health issues have increasingly come to be seen as security threats – a shift that has challenged traditional notions of what ‘Security Studies’ is all about. This module seeks to provide an understanding of the contemporary politics of health and security, identifying the health issues which have been seen as security threats and the major policy responses to them. The module locates health and disease within the key approaches to Security Studies (including state-centric and human security approaches), and requires students to critically engage with the politics and ethics of securitizing health.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

This module aims to provide students with an introduction to contemporary ageing. Opening lectures identify key critical gerontological themes underpinning the module including social construction, power, and diversity/difference. Population trends, historical perspectives, cultural norms, and current policy debates are also explored through sessions which cover the experience of ageing and old age, developments in theory, intergenerational and family relations, perspectives on gender, ethnicity and sexuality in later life, and ageism. The second part of the module will explore the relationship between theorisation of and provision for later life through group presentations on key areas of welfare. The module will offer multi-disciplinary perspectives as well as comparative references, particularly to EC societies.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework, group presentation)

From a primarily sociological perspective, this unit seeks to examine social, economic and political processes that have had an impact on the development of countries in the majority south that have primarily occurred in the post-colonial period by placing children at the centre of the analysis. To this end, it will not only explore how these processes have affected children and their development in these societies, but also how children have contributed to some of these social, economic and political processes. It will also examine how social policy nationally and globally has recognised the importance of placing children at the centre of strategic and project planning.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

This module aims to explore the rise of the new genetics. Starting with an exploration of Watson and Cricks discovery of DNA in the 1950s, the module will explore the social and ethical implications of the rise of genetic technology. The module will explore a range of topics from the implications of genetic screening to issues of human cloning. The aim of this module is to critically assess the impact of new genetics on contemporary society, exploring their relationship with both science and biomedicine.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

The course aims to introduce students to the emerging field of surveillance studies. By focusing on an exploration of the primary literature concerning recent development in surveillance theory students will be equipped to engage with sociological debates surrounding the spread of new surveillance technologies. In particular the course will explore how `surveillant solutions’ have become a dominant form of governance in the 21st century by focusing on case studies of surveillance in particular contexts such as policing and criminal justice, health and welfare, the work place, and consumer behaviour.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

This unit explores the importance of studying whiteness in order to understand racism as a system of power relationships. It explains why the construction of whiteness has become a key focus in debates about race and ethnicity and examines critically some of the key themes to emerge in this field of study. This includes exploring the historical origins of `white studies’ and assessing representations of whiteness in literary and visual culture. It also includes exploring the racialised, classed and gendered boundaries of whiteness by examining, for example, the socially and politically constructed categories of `white trash’ and the `chav’.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

Despite the increasing secularisation and rationalisation of society, evil is still an all too familiar term. For some it invokes images of devils, demons and witches, for others criminals, terrorists and murderers, whilst debates on the `social evils’ of poverty, prostitution and alcohol are continually recycled for each generation. This module aims to introduce students to a sociological approach to evil by asking them to develop their own innovative case-studies of evil in combination with published research. They will be asked to: explore the ontology of evil; examine how evil is explained and accounted for; investigate the consequences of evil; develop an understanding concerning the representation of evil and assess the aetiological precedents for that representation; and, ultimately, critically determine the role evil has within society.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

This unit explores intersections between migration and families in theory, policy and practice, in UK and internationally. It critically examines dominant theories around migration and `the family’ in the context of contemporary migration patterns and evidence of how migrants `do’ family. It explores how migration policies, in interaction with labour market and welfare policies, stratify migrants’ opportunities for family-life. Particular attention is paid to examining the transformative potential of migration for family practices (e.g. care-giving) and relations (e.g. gender and parental). Adopting a transnational lens, the role of migration in contributing to the configuration of non-migrants’ family-life is also examined.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

This module explores sociological aspects of health, illness and medicine. It will focus on issues of health inequality exploring the ways in which patterns of health and disease vary according to class, gender and race. It also provides a critical examination of biomedicine, highlighting the contemporary challenges faced by medicine as a profession. Furthermore, it will focus on new dynamic developments in science and medicine linking health with the Internet and exploring the rise of the new genetics. The aim of this course is to provide students with a critical understanding of the role of health, illness and medicine within contemporary society.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

To take this module you must take at least one sociological studies module at level 2, preferably with policy, welfare, family or global in the title

This module examines comparative theories and analyses of welfare state approaches to social policies for children, young people and families. It considers ideological, critical and theoretical perspectives about social policies in these areas. The module initially focuses on British welfare state development and restructuring in the post-war era, before examining comparative perspectives about social policies across EU member states. In particular, the module explores recent policy developments in four key areas: income support measures and anti-poverty strategies targeted at families; childcare and early years services; parenting education and support; and child protection and family support services.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Course work, portfolio)

The module explores approaches to theorising and studying intimacy and personal relationships. Beginning with the Individualisation thesis and its critics, the module will go on to explore recent moves towards conceptualising personal relationships in terms of embeddedness, relationality, intimacy and linked lives. Students will also explore a range of substantive topics within the field including memory, genealogy, material culture and home, marriage and sexuality, responsibility and care, and friendship.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

This module is concerned with the sentencing and punishment of offenders. It considers, in historical context: the philosophical underpinnings of punishment; sentencing policy and practice; and the forms that punishment takes (including custodial and non-custodial options). It also considers what we know about public attitudes toward punishment. A key issue addressed by this module is the rapid growth of the prison population since the mid-1990s: how can we explain this state of affairs, and can/should this trend be reversed?

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam)

To take this module you must take LAW110 at level 1 or LAW382 at level 2 AND LAW113 at level 1 or LAW383 at level 2

The Criminology Research Paper requires a student to submit a research paper of 6,000 words on a criminological topic that is approved in advance by the module convenor. The aim of the module is to support a student in independently carrying out research, whether library-based or empirical. It may also enable a student to study a subject that is not otherwise covered in depth on their degree. It is the student’s responsibility to select the topic and to approach the module convenor for approval. The student may only proceed with research that a member of the criminology staff is willing to supervise. The student should approach the appropriate staff member and seek agreement for the supervision of their project before opting to undertake the research paper.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Project work)

Attempts to rehabilitate offenders have a long history and have taken a variety of forms. This module considers the legitimacy and effectiveness of approaches toward offenders which come under the umbrella of `rehabilitation¿. The module focuses in particular on contemporary rehabilitative approaches used in prisons and in the context of community penalties, including the current popularity of cognitive-behavioural treatment programmes. It also examines in detail the relevance and effectiveness of rehabilitation in respect of specific groups of offenders, such as those who commit sexual offences and drug misusing offenders.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, course work)

This module will examine various aspects of prisons and imprisonment. Part one will look at the theoretical dimensions of the prison, including the philosophies of punishment, as well as continuities and changes in the history of imprisonment. In part two, the focus will be on prisoners’ varied experiences of incarceration. Topics to be covered will include prisoner subcultures, political imprisonment, and the architecture of incarceration. The third part of the module will examine penal politics and political discourse, and the impact of the representation of the prison in popular culture. The module will conclude with an examination of penal abolitionism.

(credits: 20)

(assessment: Formal exam, Coursework, seminar presentations)

To take this module you must take LAW110 at level 1 or LAW382 at level 2

This module aims to develop a multidisciplinary understanding of drugs, crime and control by engaging with the key academic and policy literature. Students will explore a wide range of drug-related issues and debates, critically analyse the laws, policies and institutions of drug control, and situate them within the wider social context. The topics covered will include: the social construction of the `drug problem’; drugs and crime; historical and contemporary perspectives on drug policy; drugs policing from the global to the local; tackling drugs through criminal justice interventions; drug control across the world; and the legalisation debate and alternatives to criminalisation.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

Crime, Law and History aims to develop an understanding of historical study in criminology and socio-legal studies. Students will encounter a range of topics, including international and comparative studies, through the 19C and early 20C. The module content will cover leading approaches, such as legal history, social history, cultural history, microhistory, gender history and quantitative history. Discussions will likely include topics such as self-protection and crime prevention, British empire and prostitution, prisons and convict labour, crime and punishment in the American `Wild West’, immigrants and racialization of crime in the UK, anarchists in London, trafficking in women, African Americans and criminal justice.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

This module will introduce students to the field of environmental criminology: briefly, the study of crime, criminality and victimisation as they relate to place and space. Whilst the history of the field will be covered, much of the module will concentrate on research previously and currently being conducted within South Yorkshire.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

The module will familiarise students with the lives of those found guilty of crimes after their punishment has ended. This includes both `traditional¿ ideas of offenders and special groups of ex-prisoners such as the wrongfully convicted. Students will learn about the theoretical explanations for why some people stop offending, and about specific elements of these processes, such as the emotional trajectory of desistance and the impact of the criminal justice system on their subsequent lives.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

Cannot take this module with LAW3032

This module explores policing on a macro-level, taking into account developments on a national and global scale. The topics covered will include: conceptualizing the police and policing; key features of policing, such as police powers, discretion, police culture and accountability; models of policing; the history of policing in the UK and elsewhere; the policing of multi-ethnic communities (who can also be thought of as ‘global citizens’); the role of the police in policing, in the light of the growing involvement of non-warranted civilians and others in policing activities; policing in other countries, including post-colonial countries; and policing in a transnational context; policing in global, late modern societies. The module will be partly empirical, but it will also be grounded in theories about the use of power; for example, it will be situated within theories about governance and social control, whilst also exploring whether and from where the police derive legitimacy in exerting power/authority over citizens.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam)

Cannot take this module with LAW3021

The module looks at key topics in relation to responses to crime and victimisation. It explores policing and prosecution, public responses, crime prevention, restorative justice and victim support. To what extent are policing and public priorities for policing aligned? How does the public view the role of the authorities? How can we support victims? Are there alternative responses to crime instead of prosecution and sentencing? What are we doing to prevent crime? Do certain types of crime require particular responses? A goal of the module will be to emphasize the interrelatedness of these topics and present them as integrated problems.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

To take this module you must also take LAW353

This module extends research methods abilities developed initially in earlier research methods modules. There, students learned to manipulate and analyse data using SPSS on a computer. Here, students will work in small groups developing research ideas to form a fully developed questionnaire, which will be subsequently administered to a small general public sample via Corporate Information and Computing Systems (CICS). Thereafter, resulting data are coded, computerised and analysed, and results written up as an individual report.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

To take this module you must take LAW110 at level 1 or LAW382 at level 2 AND LAW113 at level 1 or LAW383 at level 2

This module does not assume any knowledge of the main data analysis computer package used by criminologists to examine survey data (Statistical Package for Social Scientists SPSS). Using progressively more complex databases based on pre-existing surveys, students are taught how to enter, clean and check data, and all commands necessary to analyse survey data (frequency, cross-tabulation, correlation, select, count, etc.).

(credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework, lab work)

This module examines the experiences and treatment of men and women as victims and criminals. It examines whether and how offending patterns vary according to gender and explores connections between gender, offending and victimisation. The module also explores the treatment of and experiences of men and women within the criminal justice system. It argues that in order best to understand crime and criminal justice, criminologists must understand both as gendered.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

To take this module you must take LAW110 at level 1 or LAW382 at level 2

This module examines youth crime and `antisocial behaviour, as well as formal responses to young people who offend. During the first half of the module, contemporary and historical views of youth crime are critically examined, attending particularly to class, ethnicity and gender, and to the historical construction of youth as problematic. The second half of the module focuses on youth justice, including the role of the police, the courts, Youth Offending Teams, custodial institutions and other bodies in regulating unruly youth and preventing and responding to youth crime.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

This module explores the development of restorative justice in theory and practice and seeks to understand the contemporary popularity of restorative justice as a way of responding to offending. It considers the appeal of restorative justice to a variety of stakeholders (including offenders, victims and the wide community) and in a variety of jurisdictions, including England & Wales and Northern Ireland. It also examines the effectiveness of restorative justice interventions and how this has been assessed by researchers.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam)

This module introduces students who have not taken criminology core modules to key areas of criminological definition, empirical study, theory and the development of criminal justice systems. It equips non-criminology students with a broad understanding and so enables them to take further criminology modules if they choose. The module looks at case studies of crime and deviance from contemporary life to help students understand how some of the history and theory of criminology can be brought to bear on social and legal issues.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

Criminology is notable for the considerable number of different methods of research which have been used, ranging from participant observation and anthropological methods to national surveys, such as the British Crime Survey. The module is designed to explore the use of each of the principal methods and their associated levels of theory and explanation so that students will be able to judge whether a published study is methodologically adequate and will be able to take decisions themselves about which methods should be used for which kind of problem.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

Mandatory modules

This module provides insight into the study of human behaviour in work organisations and why people do the things that they do. It also introduces some of the basic concepts and theories of Organisation Behaviour in the world of work.

(credits: 10) (assessment: Formal exam)

This module covers a range of issues relevant to the modules covered in a Management Studies degree and includes preparatory work for each lecture and tasks to carry out afterwards, with emphasis on being provocative and not simply accepting what you are told.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework, online assignments)

This module introduces students to some of the key themes and perspectives within a number of different subject disciplines within management, through a series of 4 week ‘packages’, including marketing, operations management and strategic management, supplemented by guest speakers from within industry.

(credits: 20)

(assessment: Coursework, integrative task including podcast)

Choose 60 credits from:

To take this module you must take MGT120 at level 1

This module builds on and develops the basic concepts introduced in MGT120. Organizational Behaviour is concerned with understanding the effects of how workers think, act, and interact with each other. This involves considering a wide range of issues such as power, culture, gender and stress. However, to understand what happens inside organizations, it is also necessary to also take account of their external social, economic, and cultural environments/contexts. While considering the `general principles’ of Organizational Behaviour, this module will also relate them to issues of contemporary relevance, such as the growing importance of management by culture, and the move towards flexible working practices.(credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

This course will introduce students to business strategy and the strategic management process. It seeks to enhance their understanding of the theories and practice of strategy. Students will be able to learn why, and how, companies make strategic decisions in the context of today’s complex and dynamic world of business. Students will be introduced to various strategic analysis frameworks and learn how these can be used to help organisations better understand their strategic position and formulate feasible and suitable growth and competitive strategies. Based on a sound understanding of the theories, students will be required to apply the concepts through the use of innovative strategic planning teaching and learning technologies and case study material.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam)

This subject is concerned with the collection and analysis of data using statistical methods to support research studies and inform management decision making. It is taught at an intermediate level since a basic knowledge of statistics is assumed. It is an applied unit, and, although a high level of mathematical knowledge is not needed, students taking the unit must be numerate and capable of logical thinking.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework, case study)

This module is designed to incorporate critical reflection on the concepts of career and career management suitable for undergraduates in the School of Management for their own personal development and action planning as well as their future use as managers and employers within organisations.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

Choose 40 credits from:

The Johannesburg Earth Summit, the runaway success of No Logo, the corporate scandals and subsequent questioning of the regulatory structures within capitalism, all suggest that the relationship between business, the state and civil society is being debated with greater urgency than at any time since Milton Friedman declared the business of business is business. Again we are asking `what is the role of the firm?’ Much of the dialogue and debate surrounding this issue is being conducted under the rubric of the concepts of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and Corporate Citizenship. The emergence of these concepts and the implementation of strategies to emphasise and improve the socially responsible practices of companies represents a significant development in the ongoing debates surrounding the role of business in modern society. Supporters suggest we are witnessing the emergence of a new breed of `Corporate Citizen¿ as companies seek greater interaction with civil society, look to adopt more ethical business strategies and engagement about their practices through the provision of greater openness and access to information. This module seeks to provide an initial introduction to the key issues and themes that are emerging within the CSR field. It examines the pressures encouraging companies to adopt more ethical business strategies, the types of practices and strategies which different companies have sought to adopt in this field, and the potential advantages that are identified for a socially responsible business.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, peer assessment)

To take this module you must take MGT120 at level 1

Industrial Relations explores the nature of working relationships and the constraints within which they operate. The subject is multi-disciplinary in nature and the content of this particular unit focuses on aspects of industrial relations which practising managers may experience. The unit aims to establish a conceptual framework for understanding industrial relations based on academic theories and research data. A further aim is to develop analytical skills that look beyond symptoms and to encourage judgement founded on an understanding of likely outcomes/implications.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal examination)

Organisational psychology is fundamentally concerned with the application of psychological theories and techniques to the analysis and resolution of problems that confront the personnel and human resource management function in its endeavours to select, train, appraise and develop a competent workforce. Based very much within a tradition of experimental psychology, in which it is assumed that it is possible to measure the attributes of people and their environments, work psychology is dominated by approaches that focus on “fit” between individuals and organizations. We examine how these approaches are implicated in gender and other inequalities by challenging mainstream theory from a variety of critical perspectives.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework, group project/presentation)

To take this module you must take MGT233 at level 2

This module is concerned with the concepts and uses of advertising and promotion in an integrated marketing communications context. The successful commercialisation of both new and already existing products and services depends on how well the company will communicate any messages to its target market, to trigger desired attitudes and behaviours. However, these messages must be clear and consistent across the different means of communication available to modern businesses. Thus, advertising, public relations, sponsorship, direct marketing, product placement and any other promotional tool must be integrated and managed as a whole and not as isolated communications. Other issues covered will include e-IMC, international marketing communications, and ethics. The material builds upon the basic marketing principles discussed in MGT117 and on aspects of consumer behaviour from MGT220.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

The leisure industry is a product of industrialisation and economic growth and is important both as an economic activity and for the quality of life. This module gives an overview of the leisure industry with an emphasis on sport. It focuses in depth on five issues: the economics of professional team sport; sport’s contribution to social inclusion; the management of volunteers in sport; legacies of mega-sports events; and the nature of leisure in future society. (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam)

This unit introduces key theories of international business development: those concerning the rationales for international expansion, the choice of foreign market entry strategy and the impact on the economies of host countries. This theoretical understanding will then be illustrated and examined by reference to the way particular companies in contrasting industries have developed and implemented their international strategies. Particular attention will be devoted to the role played by the international business environment and its institutions, and to key strategic management issues such as global supply chain management, knowledge management, intellectual property protection and risk management.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

This module provides students with an understanding of international marketing. The module will prepare students for the challenge of global marketing and enable students to have sufficient knowledge to be able to take on international related work, if faced by this challenge in industry.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Project work, group presentation/in-class test)

To take this module you must take MGT231 at level 2

This module will introduce students to strategy practice and the process by which strategies and performance are realized. It seeks to enhance their understanding of the theories and frameworks in the area of strategy formation and strategic change. Students will be able to learn why, and how organizations perform and maintain the ability to perform. Students will be introduced to various strategy formation theories and frameworks and learn how these can be used to understand how and why organizations perform or underperform, to be able to suggest interventions by which organizations can be changed. Based on a sound understanding of the theories, students will be required to apply the concepts through the appreciation of case evidence and the suggestion of appropriate interventions.

(credits: 20) (assessment: Project work)

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