Applied Social Sciences

A guide to choosing

your pathway and

modules.

CLICK HERE

Applied Social Sciences

1) Read through your core modules to get an understanding of what you will learn and the

research methods you’ll be applying to your subject choices.

 

2) Explore the subject that you’d like to study as your major route. This will lead to your

degree being awards as BA Applied Social Sciences with *name of subject*. Or in the case

of Physical Geography you will be awarded BSc Applied Social Sciences with Physical

Geography. Your choices are –

 

    Human Geography

    Physical Geography

    Social Policy

Sociology

    Politics

Criminology

    Urban Studies

    Education, Childhood and Culture

Journalism

 

3) Explore the level 1 modules within your major route

 

4) Explore the subject that you’d like to study as your minor subject

 

5) Explore the level 1 modules within your minor subject

 

6) Explore a third subject module or an open choice module for your final 20 credit

level 1 module.

Top tip

If you’re unsure which major pathway you’d like to follow at level 2, consider choosing your final module from the same subject as your minor choice. At level 2 you will then be able to swap your major/minor subject choice. Your degree title will reflect your choice of major subject at level 2.

LET'S GET STARTED - Click here to learn about your core modules.

YOUR CORE MODULES.

These modules are compulsory and will give you an understanding of what you

will learn and the research methods you’ll be applying to your subject choices.

Hover over the modules to see the module description in the 'About' section.

Level

3

2

1

Methods strand

Employability strand

Module description

NEXT PAGE

YOUR MODULES.

Click on the Major and Minor subjects to view your options side by side.

You will decide on your level 1 modules when you enrol in September.

Click on a subject to activate the menu. From here you can view levels

3 to 1, their individual modules and the module descriptions.

MAJOR (40 credits)

MINOR (20 credits)

  • Human Geography

    • Level 3

      • Choose 40 credits from:

        • GEO327 Geography of Elections (credits: 20)

          This module reviews current research on the political geography of elections, dealing with both electoral behaviour and the politics of the electoral process. The course will examine how elections contribute to the development and use of power and legitimacy in political systems. Most attention will be given to the analysis of the electoral decision: what influences voters' choices? How does geography impact upon those choices? Contextual models of voting are discussed and attention will also be focused on the activities of political parties and of electoral systems in creating "electoral spaces".

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework )

        • GEO375 Cities and Modernities (credits: 20)

          The links between social conflict and cultural production in modern cities have long fascinated scholars, and recent scholarship has been marked by a renewed interest in the embodied experience of these aspects of urban life as sensory perceptions, aesthetic judgments and power relations. This module will draw from cultural, social, historical and political geographies as well as other disciplines to engage with the shifting nature and spatiality of these relationships, both through theoretical debates and through case studies of selected cities. Key topics will include urbanisation, cultural difference, social stratification, representational practices and bodily experiences of modern cities.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, project work )

    • Level 2

      • Choose 40  credits from:

        • GEO241 Social and Cultural Geographies (credits: 20)

          This module builds on GEO112 – ‘Introducing Social and Cultural Geographies’ and is divided into three key thematic/conceptual areas in contemporary social and cultural geographic study: 1) Culture: landscape, nature; 2) Identity: Discourse, Practice; 3) Memory: space, history.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework )

        • GEO243 Political Geographies (credits: 20)

          The module introduces students to contemporary debates within political geography, discussing political processes from international politics, through national politics, local and community politics and individual political behaviour.  Questions of power, efficacy and conflict are examines at all these scales.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

    • Level 1

      • Mandatory modules

        • GEO103 Region, Nation and World (credits: 10)

          The first part of this module describes the main elements and key issues involved in the global economic system. In the second part the uneven development process within the global economy is examined. In the third part it is shown how economic activities at the local level are similarly moulded by global influences.

          (credits: 10) (assessment: formal exam)

        • GEO165 New Horizons in Geography (credits: 10)

          This module provides students with a challenging but accessible insight into the cutting edge of contemporary geographical research and how it helps us understand our changing world. It provides an opportunity to see the difference that a geographical perspective can make to our understanding of some of the largest challenges facing the world.

          (credits: 10) (assessment: formal exam)

        • GEO112 Introducing Social and Cultural Geographies (credits: 10)

          An introduction to social and cultural geography focusing on a range of key concepts, current debates and contemporary issues. This module outlines current geographical thinking about space and place; culture and nature; and social exclusion. Drawing examples from around the world, the module explores the contested nature of our social world and conflicting conceptions of our place in nature/culture.

          (credits: 10) (assessment: formal exam)

        • GEO167 Geospatial Technologies (credits: 10)

          Introducing and providing hands-on experience in geospatial technologies and data (involving: remote sensing, GIS, GPS) that have changed the way businesses and policy makers solve problems and the way scientists understand the dynamics of the earth system.

          (credits: 10) (assessment: coursework)

  • Physical Geography

    • Level 3

      • Choose 40  credits from:

        • GEO345 Glacial and Periglacial Geomorphology (credits: 20)

          This module will examine geomorphological aspects of the cryosphere including the study of landforms and sediments created by ice sheets and periglacial processes both past and present.  Where relevant, the applied aspects of glacial and periglacial geomorphology will be given specific attention.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam)

        • GEO354 Contemporary Climate Change and Processes
          (credits: 20)

          This module will involve the study of climate, with the emphasis on climactic forcing factors, observation and modelling of the climate system, and ice-climate links, all on the 'contemporary' timescale (past few to next few centuries). The underpinning geophysics will be presented, but using the minimum of mathematics, in order to gain the fullest understanding of processes involved. We will also look at societal implications of climate change.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

        • GEO352 Natural Hazards (credits: 20)

          The module focuses on a number of selected topics where natural phenomena (and sometimes man's attempt to manage them) may impose deleterious, and frequently catastrophic, effects on the environment. In each case the nature and underlying causes of the 'natural hazard' are explained and the effects, including those on the biosphere in general and man in particular, are examined and discussed in some depth. Each topic is illustrated with historical or contemporary examples and involves an examination of any ways in which mankind may mitigate the extent of such hazards in the future.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, group presentation)

        • GEO368 Planetary Geoscience (credits: 20)

          This module introduces the student to the fascinating discipline of planetary geoscience and exploration. By using the principles of Physical Geography to study unfamiliar environments, we will explore problems that touch upon themes from climate, tectonics, geomorphology, hydrology, and life. The module begins with the Solar System but soon focuses on planetary-scale matters, using the terrestrial planets (Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars) as main examples because of an explosion of knowledge gathered from their observation. We will consider the new perspectives which such knowledge offers on the Earth's dynamic systems.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

    • Level 2

      • Choose 40  credits from:

        • GEO206 Environmental Change (credits: 20)

          In this module, methods and techniques to investigate past environmental changes from proxy data are outlined and illustrated, relating to huge changes which have occurred in the last 2.6 million years of the earth’s history.  Problems of distinguishing natural variability from that caused by humans are also examined.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

        • GEO233 Glacial Environments (credits: 20)

          This module covers topics relevant to glacial environments of the world, including both contemporary and former ice sheets and glaciers.  It examines how they come into existence, how glaciers work, how they modify the underlying landscape, and the sedimentary products of glaciation.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, lab work)

        • GEO234 Atmospheres and Oceans (credits: 20)

          This module provides an understanding of the global climate, focusing on the atmospheres, the oceans, and their interaction.  The first part considers the climate from the global to the local scale, with the second part examining the physical characteristics of the oceans and their role in the climate system.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

        • GEO244 Earth and Ecosystem Dynamics (credits: 20)

          This module develops understanding of environmental processes, fluxes and interactions across a spectrum of temporal and spatial scales, by adopting an earth system science approach and by considering interactions between the geosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere and biosphere.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

    • Level 1

      • Mandatory modules

        • GEO101 Physical Systems at the Global Scale (credits: 10)

          This course provides an introduction to physical geography, examining four environmental systems using a system-based approach: atmosphere, hydrosphere, geosphere and cryosphere.  The course will also consider the interactions between physical systems as well as changes and consequences of systems change.

          (credits: 10) (assessment: formal exam)

        • GEO165 New Horizons in Geography (credits: 10)

          This module provides students with a challenging but accessible insight into the cutting edge of contemporary geographical research and how it helps us understand our changing world. It provides an opportunity to see the difference that a geographical perspective can make to our understanding of some of the largest challenges facing the world.

          (credits: 10) (assessment: formal exam)

        • GEO108 Earth’s Changing Surface (credits: 10)

          Geomorphology is the science that investigates the landforms of the earth; mountains, valleys, slopes, river beds and dunes. This module introduces the fundamental principles of landscape development, including temporal and spatial scale and equilibrium.

          (credits: 10) (assessment: formal exam)

        • GEO167 Geospatial Technologies (credits: 10)

          Introducing and providing hands-on experience in geospatial technologies and data (involving: remote sensing, GIS, GPS) that have changed the way businesses and policy makers solve problems and the way scientists understand the dynamics of the earth system.

          (credits: 10) (assessment: coursework)

  • Social Policy

    • Level 3

      • Choose 40  credits from:

        • SCS3010 Ageing and Society (credits: 20)

          This module aims to provide students with an introduction to contemporary ageing. Opening lectures identify key critical gerontological themes underpinning the module including social construction, power, and diversity/difference. Population trends, historical perspectives, cultural norms, and current policy debates are also explored through sessions which cover the experience of ageing and old age, developments in theory, intergenerational and family relations, perspectives on gender, ethnicity and sexuality in later life, and ageism. The second part of the module will explore the relationship between theorisation of and provision for later life through group presentations on key areas of welfare. The module will offer multi-disciplinary perspectives as well as comparative references, particularly to EC societies.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework, group presentation)

        • SCS3012 Children and Youth within Developing Societies
          (credits: 20)

          From a primarily sociological perspective, this unit seeks to examine social, economic and political processes that have had an impact on the development of countries in the majority south that have primarily occurred in the post-colonial period by placing children at the centre of the analysis. To this end, it will not only explore how these processes have affected children and their development in these societies, but also how children have contributed to some of these social, economic and political processes. It will also examine how social policy nationally and globally has recognised the importance of placing children at the centre of strategic and project planning.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

        • SCS3021 Whiteness, Power and Privilege (credits: 20)

          This unit explores the importance of studying whiteness in order to understand racism as a system of power relationships. It explains why the construction of whiteness has become a key focus in debates about race and ethnicity and examines critically some of the key themes to emerge in this field of study. This includes exploring the historical origins of `white studies' and assessing representations of whiteness in literary and visual culture. It also includes exploring the racialised, classed and gendered boundaries of whiteness by examining, for example, the socially and politically constructed categories of `white trash' and the `chav'.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

        • SCS3025 Sociology of Evil (credits: 20)

          Despite the increasing secularisation and rationalisation of society, evil is still an all too familiar term. For some it invokes images of devils, demons and witches, for others criminals, terrorists and murderers, whilst debates on the `social evils' of poverty, prostitution and alcohol are continually recycled for each generation. This module aims to introduce students to a sociological approach to evil by asking them to develop their own innovative case-studies of evil in combination with published research. They will be asked to: explore the ontology of evil; examine how evil is explained and accounted for; investigate the consequences of evil; develop an understanding concerning the representation of evil and assess the aetiological precedents for that representation; and, ultimately, critically determine the role evil has within society.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

        • SCS3026 Migration and Families (credits: 20)

          This unit explores intersections between migration and families in theory, policy and practice, in UK and internationally. It critically examines dominant theories around migration and `the family' in the context of contemporary migration patterns and evidence of how migrants `do' family. It explores how migration policies, in interaction with labour market and welfare policies, stratify migrants' opportunities for family-life. Particular attention is paid to examining the transformative potential of migration for family practices (e.g. care-giving) and relations (e.g. gender and parental). Adopting a transnational lens, the role of migration in contributing to the configuration of non-migrants' family-life is also examined.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

        • SCS3028 Sociology of Health, Illness and Medicine (credits: 20)

          This module explores sociological aspects of health, illness and medicine. It will focus on issues of health inequality exploring the ways in which patterns of health and disease vary according to class, gender and race. It also provides a critical examination of biomedicine, highlighting the contemporary challenges faced by medicine as a profession. Furthermore, it will focus on new dynamic developments in science and medicine linking health with the Internet and exploring the rise of the new genetics. The aim of this course is to provide students with a critical understanding of the role of health, illness and medicine within contemporary society.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

        • SCS3031 How to Lie with Statistics (credits: 20)

          The course will critically assess the uses of statistics and statistical indicators both in the media and sociological academic literature. This unit also expands the previous quantitative modules to include an introduction to multivariate statistics. This will incorporate Ordinary Least Squares regression and a brief overview of other regression techniques used in social sciences. Students will become familiar with the key role that secondary data analysis now plays in sociology and social policy. Students will work in groups and undertake a small secondary data analysis project of their own devising using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS).

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework, group presentation)

        • SCS3014 Men, Masculinities and Gender Relations (credits: 20)

          This unit will seek to provide a critical examination of the growing body of sociological and other literature concerned with men and masculinities. It will locate this growth of interest in the context of the rise of the feminist critique of patriarchy and wider shifts in the economic and social order. Gender relations will also be considered in this framework. Particular attention will be paid to methodological and epistemological issues involved in the study of men and masculinities. Key concepts such as `hegemonic masculinities' and `sex roles' will be explored and problematised. Specific topics and case studies can include: men in work and organisations, men and violence, men and sexualities, men and sport and men and feminism.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

        • SCS3015 Sociology of the New Genetics (credits: 20)

          This module aims to explore the rise of the new genetics. Starting with an exploration of Watson and Cricks discovery of DNA in the 1950s, the module will explore the social and ethical implications of the rise of genetic technology. The module will explore a range of topics from the implications of genetic screening to issues of human cloning. The aim of this module is to critically assess the impact of new genetics on contemporary society, exploring their relationship with both science and biomedicine.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

        • SCS3018 The Sociology of Surveillance (credits: 20)

          The course aims to introduce students to the emerging field of surveillance studies. By focusing on an exploration of the primary literature concerning recent development in surveillance theory students will be equipped to engage with sociological debates surrounding the spread of new surveillance technologies. In particular the course will explore how `surveillant solutions' have become a dominant form of governance in the 21st century by focusing on case studies of surveillance in particular contexts such as policing and criminal justice, health and welfare, the work place, and consumer behaviour.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

        • SCS3032 Children, Families, and Welfare States (credits: 20)

          This module examines comparative theories and analyses of welfare state approaches to social policies for children, young people and families. It considers ideological, critical and theoretical perspectives about social policies in these areas. The module initially focuses on British welfare state development and restructuring in the post-war era, before examining comparative perspectives about social policies across EU member states. In particular, the module explores recent policy developments in four key areas: income support measures and anti-poverty strategies targeted at families; childcare and early years services; parenting education and support; and child protection and family support services.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework, portfolio)

        • SCS3036 Intimacy and Personal Relationships (credits: 20)

          The module explores approaches to theorising and studying intimacy and personal relationships. Beginning with the Individualisation thesis and its critics, the module will go on to explore recent moves towards conceptualising personal relationships in terms of embeddedness, relationality, intimacy and linked lives. Students will also explore a range of substantive topics within the field including memory, genealogy, material culture and home, marriage and sexuality, responsibility and care, and friendship.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

    • Level 2

      • Mandatory module

        • SCS2002 Varieties of Welfare (credits: 20)

          This module locates UK social policy within a wider international context and provides a breadth of study in considering the nature of social problems, the operation of social divisions and the role of the state and other agencies of welfare in responding to these and a range of other social issues in countries around the world.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, assessed presentation)

      • Choose 20 credits from:

        • SCS2005 Race and Racism (credits: 20)

          This module explores the meaning of race in various social and political contexts, examining how ideas about race help to shape and determine social and political relations, and exploring the role of race as a major source of social divisions.  Themes include racism, multiculturalism, Muslims, immigration and education.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

        • SCS2006 Sociology of the Family (credits: 20)

          Using a sociological and anthropological perspective this unit seeks to problematise the concept of `family' as a natural and universal phenomenon, focusing in particular on the role of the state in constructing the family, and highlighting the impact these different constructions of family life have on particular individuals such as women, children and the elderly.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework, project work)

        • SCS2009 Sociology of Crime and Deviance (credits: 20)

          This module will review the historical development of a range of theoretical approaches to the study of crime and deviancy, consider how sociologists have studied the primary institutions of social control such as the police, courts and prisons, and finally consider the contribution of the sociology of crime and deviance to issues of contemporary significance.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

        • SCS2010 Social Policy and Criminology (credits: 20)

          Social Policy and Criminology examines responses to crime that do not rely on criminal justice responses of police, courts and prisons. Specifically, the module reviews and appraises social policy responses, including health, housing, education, employment, youth and family as a means of crime reduction.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

        • SCS2016 Media Studies (credits: 20)

          This unit critically explores the development of media studies, incorporating classical and contemporary theorists, and demonstrates through key debates about media ownership, media effects and representation how the field has changed and what has remained intact over the course of its development.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

        • SCS2007 Social Policy in Global Context (credits: 20)

          This module investigates how international factors help to shape national social policies, beginning with an examination of the impact of world-regional bodies, such as the European Union, extending to international governmental institutions, including the World Bank, IMF, WTO and OECD.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

    • Level 1

      • Mandatory modules

        • SCS1003 Understanding Inequality (credits: 10)

          This unit explores a key concern of sociology to explain how and why material and symbolic rewards are distributed unequally, such as wealth, privilege and power.  It will focus on divisions in social class, gender and race, as well as sexuality, age, religion and disability.

          (credits: 10) (assessment: formal exam)

        • SCS1004 Social Divisions Seminar (credits: 10)

          This unit explores a key concern of sociology to explain how and why material and symbolic rewards are distributed unequally, providing students with a sociological framework to assess how social divisions operate in their own lives.

          (credits: 10) (assessment: portfolio & essays)

        • SCS1009 Welfare Politics and the State (credits: 10)

          This module introduces students to some of the material and theoretical concerns of social policy as well as considering collective responses to social problems in historical and contemporary context, and the effects of social change on the design and delivery of welfare policies.

          (credits: 10) (assessment: formal exam)

        • SCS1010 Social Problems and Social Policy (credits: 10)

          This module supports its lecture-based sister module through allowing students to consider in depth, some of the material and theoretical concerns of social policy raised by the question

          “What are social problems and how do societies deal with them?”

          (credits: 10) (assessment: Coursework, portfolio & essays)

  • Sociology

    • Level 3

      • Choose 40 credits from:

        • SCS3010 Ageing and Society (credits: 20)

          This module aims to provide students with an introduction to contemporary ageing. Opening lectures identify key critical gerontological themes underpinning the module including social construction, power, and diversity/difference. Population trends, historical perspectives, cultural norms, and current policy debates are also explored through sessions which cover the experience of ageing and old age, developments in theory, intergenerational and family relations, perspectives on gender, ethnicity and sexuality in later life, and ageism. The second part of the module will explore the relationship between theorisation of and provision for later life through group presentations on key areas of welfare. The module will offer multi-disciplinary perspectives as well as comparative references, particularly to EC societies.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework, group presentation)

        • SCS3012 Children and Youth within Developing Societies
          (credits: 20)

          From a primarily sociological perspective, this unit seeks to examine social, economic and political processes that have had an impact on the development of countries in the majority south that have primarily occurred in the post-colonial period by placing children at the centre of the analysis. To this end, it will not only explore how these processes have affected children and their development in these societies, but also how children have contributed to some of these social, economic and political processes. It will also examine how social policy nationally and globally has recognised the importance of placing children at the centre of strategic and project planning.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

        • SCS3021 Whiteness, Power and Privilege (credits: 20)

          This unit explores the importance of studying whiteness in order to understand racism as a system of power relationships. It explains why the construction of whiteness has become a key focus in debates about race and ethnicity and examines critically some of the key themes to emerge in this field of study. This includes exploring the historical origins of `white studies' and assessing representations of whiteness in literary and visual culture. It also includes exploring the racialised, classed and gendered boundaries of whiteness by examining, for example, the socially and politically constructed categories of `white trash' and the `chav'.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

        • SCS3025 Sociology of Evil (credits: 20)

          Despite the increasing secularisation and rationalisation of society, evil is still an all too familiar term. For some it invokes images of devils, demons and witches, for others criminals, terrorists and murderers, whilst debates on the `social evils' of poverty, prostitution and alcohol are continually recycled for each generation. This module aims to introduce students to a sociological approach to evil by asking them to develop their own innovative case-studies of evil in combination with published research. They will be asked to: explore the ontology of evil; examine how evil is explained and accounted for; investigate the consequences of evil; develop an understanding concerning the representation of evil and assess the aetiological precedents for that representation; and, ultimately, critically determine the role evil has within society.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

        • SCS3026 Migration and Families (credits: 20)

          This unit explores intersections between migration and families in theory, policy and practice, in UK and internationally. It critically examines dominant theories around migration and `the family' in the context of contemporary migration patterns and evidence of how migrants `do' family. It explores how migration policies, in interaction with labour market and welfare policies, stratify migrants' opportunities for family-life. Particular attention is paid to examining the transformative potential of migration for family practices (e.g. care-giving) and relations (e.g. gender and parental). Adopting a transnational lens, the role of migration in contributing to the configuration of non-migrants' family-life is also examined.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

        • SCS3028 Sociology of Health, Illness and Medicine (credits: 20)

          This module explores sociological aspects of health, illness and medicine. It will focus on issues of health inequality exploring the ways in which patterns of health and disease vary according to class, gender and race. It also provides a critical examination of biomedicine, highlighting the contemporary challenges faced by medicine as a profession. Furthermore, it will focus on new dynamic developments in science and medicine linking health with the Internet and exploring the rise of the new genetics. The aim of this course is to provide students with a critical understanding of the role of health, illness and medicine within contemporary society.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

        • SCS3031 How to Lie with Statistics (credits: 20)

          The course will critically assess the uses of statistics and statistical indicators both in the media and sociological academic literature. This unit also expands the previous quantitative modules to include an introduction to multivariate statistics. This will incorporate Ordinary Least Squares regression and a brief overview of other regression techniques used in social sciences. Students will become familiar with the key role that secondary data analysis now plays in sociology and social policy. Students will work in groups and undertake a small secondary data analysis project of their own devising using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS).

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework, group presentation)

        • SCS3014 Men, Masculinities and Gender Relations (credits: 20)

          This unit will seek to provide a critical examination of the growing body of sociological and other literature concerned with men and masculinities. It will locate this growth of interest in the context of the rise of the feminist critique of patriarchy and wider shifts in the economic and social order. Gender relations will also be considered in this framework. Particular attention will be paid to methodological and epistemological issues involved in the study of men and masculinities. Key concepts such as `hegemonic masculinities' and `sex roles' will be explored and problematised. Specific topics and case studies can include: men in work and organisations, men and violence, men and sexualities, men and sport and men and feminism.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

        • SCS3015 Sociology of the New Genetics (credits: 20)

          This module aims to explore the rise of the new genetics. Starting with an exploration of Watson and Cricks discovery of DNA in the 1950s, the module will explore the social and ethical implications of the rise of genetic technology. The module will explore a range of topics from the implications of genetic screening to issues of human cloning. The aim of this module is to critically assess the impact of new genetics on contemporary society, exploring their relationship with both science and biomedicine.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

        • SCS3018 The Sociology of Surveillance (credits: 20)

          The course aims to introduce students to the emerging field of surveillance studies. By focusing on an exploration of the primary literature concerning recent development in surveillance theory students will be equipped to engage with sociological debates surrounding the spread of new surveillance technologies. In particular the course will explore how `surveillant solutions' have become a dominant form of governance in the 21st century by focusing on case studies of surveillance in particular contexts such as policing and criminal justice, health and welfare, the work place, and consumer behaviour.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

        • SCS3032 Children, Families, and Welfare States (credits: 20)

          This module examines comparative theories and analyses of welfare state approaches to social policies for children, young people and families. It considers ideological, critical and theoretical perspectives about social policies in these areas. The module initially focuses on British welfare state development and restructuring in the post-war era, before examining comparative perspectives about social policies across EU member states. In particular, the module explores recent policy developments in four key areas: income support measures and anti-poverty strategies targeted at families; childcare and early years services; parenting education and support; and child protection and family support services.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework, portfolio)

        • SCS3036 Intimacy and Personal Relationships (credits: 20)

          The module explores approaches to theorising and studying intimacy and personal relationships. Beginning with the Individualisation thesis and its critics, the module will go on to explore recent moves towards conceptualising personal relationships in terms of embeddedness, relationality, intimacy and linked lives. Students will also explore a range of substantive topics within the field including memory, genealogy, material culture and home, marriage and sexuality, responsibility and care, and friendship.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

    • Level 2

      • Mandatory module

        • SCS2001 Sociological Theory and Analysis (credits: 20)

          The aim of this module is to build on and develop students' understanding of Sociological theory, beginning with an exploration of the work of modern social theorists such as Talcott Parsons and concluding with a focus on contemporary theorists such as Donna Haraway.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

      • Choose 20 credits from:

        • SCS2005 Race and Racism (credits: 20)

          This module explores the meaning of race in various social and political contexts, examining how ideas about race help to shape and determine social and political relations, and exploring the role of race as a major source of social divisions.  Themes include racism, multiculturalism, Muslims, immigration and education.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

        • SCS2006 Sociology of the Family (credits: 20)

          Using a sociological and anthropological perspective this unit seeks to problematise the concept of `family' as a natural and universal phenomenon, focusing in particular on the role of the state in constructing the family, and highlighting the impact these different constructions of family life have on particular individuals such as women, children and the elderly.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework, project work)

        • SCS2009 Sociology of Crime and Deviance (credits: 20)

          This module will review the historical development of a range of theoretical approaches to the study of crime and deviancy, consider how sociologists have studied the primary institutions of social control such as the police, courts and prisons, and finally consider the contribution of the sociology of crime and deviance to issues of contemporary significance.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

        • SCS2010 Social Policy and Criminology (credits: 20)

          Social Policy and Criminology examines responses to crime that do not rely on criminal justice responses of police, courts and prisons. Specifically, the module reviews and appraises social policy responses, including health, housing, education, employment, youth and family as a means of crime reduction.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

        • SCS2016 Media Studies (credits: 20)

          This unit critically explores the development of media studies, incorporating classical and contemporary theorists, and demonstrates through key debates about media ownership, media effects and representation how the field has changed and what has remained intact over the course of its development.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

    • Level 1

      • Mandatory modules

        • SCS1001 The Sociology of Everyday Life (credits: 10)

          This module introduces students to basic sociological concepts such as “the sociological imagination” and “social interaction” and illustrates how they can be applied to everyday life.  A range of everyday life situations, such as shopping, mobile phone use and travel, will be used as examples.

          (credits: 10) (assessment: formal exam)

        • SCS1002 The Sociological Imagination (credits: 10)

          Alongside module SCS1001, students will explore a range of everyday life situations from a sociological perspective, such as mobile phone use, shopping and travel, by reflexively exploring their own experience as well as gathering examples from print and digital media, and doing exercises on specific topics.

          (credits: 10) (assessment: portfolio & 2 pieces)

        • SCS1011 Classical Sociological Theory (credits: 10)

          This module introduces foundational theories in sociology by describing the ideas of leading theorists Durkheim, Marx and Weber.  Lectures will analyse the primary texts of sociological thoughts with reference to the social contexts in which they emerged, including the concerns of the first generation of sociological thinkers.

          (credits: 10) (assessment: formal exam)

        • SCS1012 Exploring Classical Social Thought Seminars
          (credits: 10)

          This seminar module provides a medium for students to discuss, evaluate, assess and engage foundational theories in sociology, relating major sociological theories to historical events.  The discussions will also emphasise ideas and concepts in key sociological writings.

          (credits: 10) (assessment: Coursework & portfolio)

  • Politics

    • Level 3

      If you choose 20 credits from the list on the left, you must choose 20 from the list on the right.

      • POL368

        Contemporary Rights Theory
        (credits: 20)

        The module aims to introduce students to the development of the philosophy of contemporary rights theory in its legal, moral and political dimensions with particular reference to areas of conflict and debate. Issues covered include natural rights, human rights, socio-legal rights, the rights of the citizen, group rights, the right to self-determination, animal rights and the right to life.

        (credits: 20)

        (assessment: Coursework)

      • POL393 Elections and Voting
        (credits: 20)

        This module focuses on the study of elections and voting behaviour. Particular emphasis will be placed on elections and voting patterns in Britain and the United States, although not exclusively so. Factors at the core of democratic legitimacy will be examined, such as why individuals vote (or do not vote) and why they vote the way they do. Topics covered will include participation, theories of voting behaviour, election campaigns and electoral systems.

        (credits: 20)

        (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

      • POL3001

        The Political Economy of Africa
        (credits: 20)

        This module reviews and explores the key themes of Africa's contemporary political economy. In doing so, it concentrates on Africa's relationship with the global political economy, and raises questions about the nature of state action in African countries.

        (credits: 20)

        (assessment: Coursework)

      • POL3005 Civilisation,

        Empire and Hegemony
        (credits: 20)

        With American power seemingly all powerful today, this unit provides a rethink of the origins of great power politics/economics. Mainstream Eurocentric theories in International Relations view great power politics/economics as having universal materialist properties. And they view America and Britain as hegemons that provide global public goods for the benefit of all. This module problematises this view by revealing the differing moral foundations and 'standards of civilisation' that inform the various directions that great power can take. It examines Britain and China in the pre-1900 era, contemporary America, Japan, and the potential role of China in the coming decades.

         (credits: 20)

        (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

      • POL3019 Terrorism,

        Violence and the State
        (credits: 20)

        This module aims to provide students with an understanding of the nature and legitimacy of forms of protest against the modern state. In particular the module focuses on issues of contemporary terrorism. However, in order to understand the nature and motivations of terrorism it is necessary to understand the nature of the modern state and other, non-violent forms of protest such as civil disobedience

        (credits: 20)

        (assessment: Coursework)

      • POL3021

        Cuba in the Post-Bipolar World
        (credits: 20)

        This module aims to provide students with an understanding of the political, social and economic factors explaining the Cuban Revolution's survival of the collapse of the Soviet Bloc. Against a background of analysis of Cuban nationalism and post-revolutionary development, the focus will be on achieving a critical understanding of: the impacts of the Soviet collapse and intensification of the US blockade; the nature and effects of Cuba's strategic 'marketisation' and 'opening' to global capitalism; the evolution of political participation and civil society in Cuba; and the development of Cuba's foreign policy.

        (credits: 20)

        (assessment: Coursework)

      • POL3107

        Politics and the Quality of Life
        (credits: 20)

        This module aims to provide students with an understanding of contemporary political debates on quality of life issues and their relation to philosophical traditions within and beyond the main British political parties. This includes analysis of how quality of life is defined and measured in different contexts and relates this debate to long-standing debates on poverty, social exclusion and social capital. Attention is paid to the quality of life aspects of public policies.

        (credits: 20)

        (assessment: Coursework)

      • POL3115 Reading Politics
        (credits: 20)

        This module is based on a full reading of five small (circa 150pp) but influential texts that cover core themes in modern Politics such as morality, power, and representation. Each text receives two weeks' attention: one to review the text's content and key arguments; and a second to discuss, interpret and evaluate. The module gives students a unique opportunity to consider key politics texts in themselves and in context.

        The texts are only loosely connected; the idea is not to offer an integrated set of books which constitute a genre; rather it is to provide students with access to secular modern texts on core Politics themes.

        (credits: 20)

        (assessment: Coursework)

      • POL3119

        Party Politics: Competition, Strategies and Campaigns
        (credits: 20)

        This module provides an in-depth analysis of party politics. It offers a detailed exposition of the multiple issues related with parties, looking at the interactions both within and outside parties. The module covers key aspects of party politics such as the different types of parties, their organization, party membership, types of party systems, political competition and issue positioning, campaign strategies, formation of new parties, the effects of cleavages, coalition formation, party financing and the number of parties.

        (credits: 20)

        (assessment: Coursework)

      • POL3121 War, Peace and Justice
        (credits: 20)

        This module studies war, peace and justice. It examines the causes, manifestations and changing nature of war, looking at ethnic conflict, the war on terror and the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. It examines peace, in particular focusing on peacebuilding in post-conflict situations and dealing with the psychological wounds caused by war. The third component examines the meaning of justice after conflict, at the ways at which justice is arrived at (for example though the prosecution of war criminals), and at whether justice is necessary for peace.

        (credits: 20)

        (assessment: Coursework)

      • POL3129 Parliamentary Studies
        (credits: 20)

        This module focuses on how parliaments and legislatures operate and is founded on the basis of theoretically-informed but policy-relevant teaching. It therefore attempts to provide students with a sense of why cultures, traditions and informal relationships matter as much (if not more) than formal procedures. Although the House of Commons and the House of Lords provide the main institutional focus for this module students will be encouraged to adopt a comparative approach whenever possible and to situate their analysis within an appreciation of the changing role of parliament within evolving frameworks of multi-level governance.

        (credits: 20)

        (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

      • POL3133 State Failure
        (credits: 20)

        This module bridges the gap between the international political environment and domestic polity. It takes three foundational characteristics of the contemporary state - population, territory and rule - and explores each from conceptual, theoretical and historical perspectives. Its starting point is the nature of the modern state and the stresses to which it is subject that can, in certain circumstances, lead to 'failure'. Central to the module is the rarity of 'state death' and the reasons for, and the consequences of, this rarity; it also considers the emergence of sub-category of states - the failed state - and what this means for our understanding of politics.

        (credits: 20)

        (assessment: Coursework)

      • POL3137

        Peacekeeping, State-building and International  Intervention
        (credits: 20)

        This module looks at the way international intervention has changed in recent years. It draws on a number of different areas - humanitarian intervention, peacekeeping, development and state-building. It draws these areas together by exploring what they have in common and how there has been a shift in the way that international intervention deals with these issues. In particular, the international community has moved from direct involvement towards a form of governance that operates from a distance by encouraging local ownership, capacity building and resilience.

        (credits: 20)

        (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

      • POL3139

        Pandemics and Panics: Health, Security and Global Politics
        (credits: 20)

        In today's globalized world, infectious diseases and other health issues have increasingly come to be seen as security threats - a shift that has challenged traditional notions of what 'Security Studies' is all about. This module seeks to provide an understanding of the contemporary politics of health and security, identifying the health issues which have been seen as security threats and the major policy responses to them. The module locates health and disease within the key approaches to Security Studies (including state-centric and human security approaches), and requires students to critically engage with the politics and ethics of securitizing health.

        (credits: 20)

        (assessment: Coursework)

      • POL3002 The Political

        Economy of Africa Project
         (credits: 20)

        This module involves supervised research on an agreed topic arising out of work done on the taught module POL3002 - The Political Economy of Africa. Students will meet their tutor individually, undertake individual research and be assessed on the basis of a 7,000 word essay.

        (credits: 20)

        (assessment: Coursework)

      • POL3006 Civilisation, Empire and Hegemony: Project
        (credits: 20)

        This module involves supervised research on an agreed topic arising out of work done on the taught module POL3005 - Civilisation, Empire and Hegemony. Students will meet their tutor individually, undertake individual research and be assessed on the basis of a 7,000 word essay.

        (credits: 20)

        (assessment: Coursework)

      • POL3020 Terrorism, Violence and the State Project
        (credits: 20)

        This module involves supervised research on an agreed topic arising out of work done on the taught module POL3019, Terrorism, Violence and the State. Students will meet with their tutor individually, undertake research and be assessed on the basis of a 7,000 word project.

        (credits: 20)

        (assessment: Project work)

      • POL3022 Cuba in the

        Post Bi-Polar World Project
        (credits: 20)

        This module involves supervised research on an agreed topic arising out of work done on the taught module POL3021, Cuba in the Post-Bipolar World. Students will meet with their tutor individually, undertake research and be assessed on the basis of a 7,000 word project.

        (credits: 20)

        (assessment: Coursework)

      • POL3108 Politics and the

        Quality of Life Project
        (credits: 20)

        This module involves supervised research on an agreed topic arising out of work done on the taught module POL3107, Politics and the Quality of Life. Students will meet with their tutor individually, undertake research and be assessed on the basis of a 7,000 word project.

        (credits: 20)

        (assessment: Coursework)

      • POL3120 Party Politics: Competition, Strategies and Campaigns Project
        (credits: 20)

        This module involves supervised research on an agreed topic arising out of work done on the taught module POL3119 Party Politics: Competition, Strategies & Campaigns. Students will meet with their tutor individually, undertake research and be assessed on the basis of a 7,000 word project.

        (credits: 20)

        (assessment: Project work)

      • POL3130

        Parliamentary Studies Project
        (credits: 20)

        This module involves supervised research on an agreed topic arising out of work done on the taught module POL3129 Parliamentary Studies. Students will meet their tutor individually, undertake individual research and be assessed on the basis of a 7,000 word essay.

        (credits: 20)

        (assessment: Project work)

    • Level 2

      • Choose 40 credits from:

        • POL206 The Politics and Government of the European Union
          (credits: 20)

          This module will provide students with a working knowledge of European integration, and of the main institutions of the European Union, including the Council of Ministers, the Commission and the Parliament. The module consists of a series of lectures on the history and institutions of the European Union, and seminars to discuss issues raised in the lectures.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

        • POL217 The Global Political Economy (credits: 20)

          This module provides an account of the major theoretical traditions which seek to interpret and explain the global political economy, including liberalism and interdependence theory; mercantilism, nationalism and hegemonic stability theory; and Marxism, and ends by reviewing the debate around the meaning of globalisation.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

        • POL223 International Relations Theory (credits: 20)

          This module examines the beginnings of the Discipline and demonstrates how these origins have continued to shape contemporary international relations theory, outlining the key areas of theoretical debate, including Realism, Liberalism, Marxism, Postmodernism, Constructivism, Neorealism, Feminism and Critical Theory.

           (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

        • POL224 Modern Political Thought (credits: 20)

          This module provides an overview of the history of modern political thought (c.1600-1900), by engaging with key philosophical texts from the period and exploring different understandings of the nature of politics and key political concepts contained within them.  A selection of philosophers will be studied.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

        • POL225 New Politics of Latin America (credits: 20)

          This module focuses on the origins, impact, and political consequences of, and responses to, neoliberalism, with reference to the developing world, in particular Latin America.  It will analyse responses to neoliberalism by states and alliances of states, by political parties and social movements, using empirical case studies.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

        • POL226 Comparative Politics: Citizens, States, Power and Protest
          (credits: 20)

          This module introduces theories and methods of conducting comparative political analysis through an examination of democracy, allowing students with some experience of comparative politics from Level One (POL109) to build on and deepen existing knowledge.  Topics include governance, bureaucracy and the mass media.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

        • POL230 Contemporary Security Challenges (credits: 20)

          This module examines a series of key contemporary challenges to international security, addressing debates about the changing nature of security and analysing some of the causes of conflict and the development of new security threats, and providing students with an informed understanding of current security-related issues.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

        • POL231 Never Mind the Ballots! State and Society in the UK Today
          (credits: 20)

          This module explores changing state-society relationships across the UK, and their impact on government institutions, examining where power resides within the state; how citizens interact with the state; and how the contemporary state should be understood in terms of accountability, legitimacy and governability.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

        • POL232 Contemporary US Foreign Policy (credits: 20)

          An introduction to contemporary US foreign policy, assessing issues such as ‘How is foreign policy made in Washington?’ through some of the primary challenges facing America today: including the War on Terror, climate change, and the re-emergence of a multipolar world order.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

    • Level 1

      • Mandatory module

        • POL113 Introduction to Political Analysis (credits: 20)

          This module provides an introduction to the theories, methods and approaches which shape political analysis, by exploring the relationship between knowledge, its validation and the methods used to collect information, in addition to the language of political analysis.

          (credits: 20)

          (assessment: Formal exam, coursework, group project - website)

      • Choose 20 credits from:

        • POL109 Comparing Modern Polities (credits: 20)

          This module examines the utility of the comparative approach to politics by examining executives in a number of political systems and focussing on ‘constitutional engineering’, with cases such as US presidency, Brazilian presidency and the UK prime minister.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

        • POL110 An Introduction to the History of Western Political Thought
          (credits: 20)

          This module provides an introduction to key themes and thinkers in Western political thought, including the relation between human nature and politics, explored through a series of deep conflicts (reason and desire, the state and individual, the public and private).

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

        • POL111 The Politics of Globalisation (credits: 20)

          This module takes an overview of the ideas and issues that have shaped understandings of globalisation, delivered through the introduction of the concepts of sovereignty and international order.  Students will gain the basic analytical tools required to make sense of international affairs.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

        • POL114 Introduction to Security Studies (credits: 20)

          This module examines the nature of security in global politics, examining security issues such as alliances and the Cold War, as well as broader human security related conceptions such as humanitarian intervention and ‘R2P’ (right to protect), and finally migration, climate change and pandemic disease.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

        • POL115 Consensus, Crisis, and Coalition:

          Introduction to British Politics (credits: 20)

          This module introduces students to British politics as experienced through key leaders and events, including a ‘leadership’ theme and the study of the fluid nature of political leadership, and a ‘consensus’ theme exploring post-war consensus and its impact.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

  • Criminology

    • Level 3

      • Mandatory module to replace Dissertation or research module

        • LAW332 Criminology Research Project (credits: 20)

          This module extends research methods abilities developed initially in earlier research methods modules. There, students learned to manipulate and analyse data using SPSS on a computer. Here, students will work in small groups developing research ideas to form a fully developed questionnaire, which will be subsequently administered to a small general public sample via Corporate Information and Computing Systems (CICS). Thereafter, resulting data are coded, computerised and analysed, and results written up as an individual report.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

      • Choose 60 credits from:

        • LAW317 The Rehabilitation of Offenders (credits: 20)

          Attempts to rehabilitate offenders have a long history and have taken a variety of forms. This module considers the legitimacy and effectiveness of approaches toward offenders which come under the umbrella of `rehabilitation¿. The module focuses in particular on contemporary rehabilitative approaches used in prisons and in the context of community penalties, including the current popularity of cognitive-behavioural treatment programmes. It also examines in detail the relevance and effectiveness of rehabilitation in respect of specific groups of offenders, such as those who commit sexual offences and drug misusing offenders.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

        • LAW331 Criminal Process (credits: 20)

          The module aims to familiarise students with various criminal justice models and the nature of English criminal processes. Students will study the structure and functions of key institutions, and the role of various actors within the system. This may include modelling of the criminal justice system; values and the criminal justice system; police powers (eg, stop and search, detention); suspect rights; prosecution and pre-trial decisions; bail custody decisions; criminal legal aid; mode of trial; magistrates' court personnel and proceedings; judges and jury trial; 'system errors' and the machinery for correcting them.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam)

        • LAW378 Internet Crime (credits: 20)

          Internet Crime focuses on the relationships between crime, criminal justice, culture and the development of new communications and information technologies such as computing, mobile phones, CCTV and the world wide web. The module explores the nature of `net-crime¿; the issues raised in preventing, detecting and controlling such crime; the potential of new technology as a tool for investigating crime and the debates around privacy, regulation, human rights, freedom of expression and representation that are allied to new technologies and criminal activities.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

        • LAW380 Gender, Crime and Criminal Justice (credits: 20)

          This module examines the experiences and treatment of men and women as victims and criminals. It examines whether and how offending patterns vary according to gender and explores connections between gender, offending and victimisation. The module also explores the treatment of and experiences of men and women within the criminal justice system. It argues that in order best to understand crime and criminal justice, criminologists must understand both as gendered.

           (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

        • LAW3002 Patterns in Crime (credits: 20)

          This module will introduce students to the field of environmental criminology: briefly, the study of crime, criminality and victimisation as they relate to place and space. Whilst the history of the field will be covered, much of the module will concentrate on research previously and currently being conducted within South Yorkshire.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

        • LAW3017 Life after Punishment: Leaving Crime Behind
          (credits: 20)

          The module will familiarise students with the lives of those found guilty of crimes after their punishment has ended. This includes both `traditional¿ ideas of offenders and special groups of ex-prisoners such as the wrongfully convicted. Students will learn about the theoretical explanations for why some people stop offending, and about specific elements of these processes, such as the emotional trajectory of desistance and the impact of the criminal justice system on their subsequent lives.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

        • LAW3021 Police and Policing in a Global Context (credits: 20)

          This module explores policing on a macro-level, taking into account developments on a national and global scale. The topics covered will include: conceptualizing the police and policing; key features of policing, such as police powers, discretion, police culture and accountability; models of policing; the history of policing in the UK and elsewhere; the policing of multi-ethnic communities (who can also be thought of as 'global citizens'); the role of the police in policing, in the light of the growing involvement of non-warranted civilians and others in policing activities; policing in other countries, including post-colonial countries; and policing in a transnational context; policing in global, late modern societies. The module will be partly empirical, but it will also be grounded in theories about the use of power; for example, it will be situated within theories about governance and social control, whilst also exploring whether and from where the police derive legitimacy in exerting power/authority over citizens.

           (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam)

        • LAW3028 Miscarriages of Justice

          and their Consequences -The Innocence Project (credits: 20)

          The Miscarriages of Justice Review Centre is a student-led project which centres upon the study of wrongful criminal convictions. Undergraduate students are involved in real criminal cases and their investigative work is supervised by academics in conjunction with practising solicitors and barristers. Students have a valuable role in ensuring that alleged wrongful convictions are referred back to the Court of Appeal via the Criminal Cases Review Commission. The module provides a good grounding in the key skills needed to be a successful practitioner, including interviewing, legal research and legal report writing skills and also improves academic rigour.

           (credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework, assessment of student’s work and contribution within the clinical legal environment by supervision, diary file and learning log and a portfolio)

        • LAW3029 Prisons and Imprisonment (credits: 20)

          This module will examine various aspects of prisons and imprisonment. Part one will look at the theoretical dimensions of the prison, including the philosophies of punishment, as well as continuities and changes in the history of imprisonment. In part two, the focus will be on prisoners' varied experiences of incarceration. Topics to be covered will include prisoner subcultures, political imprisonment, and the architecture of incarceration. The third part of the module will examine penal politics and political discourse, and the impact of the representation of the prison in popular culture. The module will conclude with an examination of penal abolitionism.

          (credits: 20)

          (assessment: Formal exam, coursework, seminar presentations)

        • LAW3030 Drugs, Crime and Control (credits: 20)

          This module aims to develop a multidisciplinary understanding of drugs, crime and control by engaging with the key academic and policy literature. Students will explore a wide range of drug-related issues and debates, critically analyse the laws, policies and institutions of drug control, and situate them within the wider social context. The topics covered will include: the social construction of the `drug problem'; drugs and crime; historical and contemporary perspectives on drug policy; drugs policing from the global to the local; tackling drugs through criminal justice interventions; drug control across the world; and the legalisation debate and alternatives to criminalisation.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

        • LAW3031 Crime, Law and History (credits: 20)

          Crime, Law and History aims to develop an understanding of historical study in criminology and socio-legal studies. Students will encounter a range of topics, including international and comparative studies, through the 19C and early 20C. The module content will cover leading approaches, such as legal history, social history, cultural history, microhistory, gender history and quantitative history. Discussions will likely include topics such as self-protection and crime prevention, British empire and prostitution, prisons and convict labour, crime and punishment in the American `Wild West', immigrants and racialization of crime in the UK, anarchists in London, trafficking in women, African Americans and criminal justice.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

    • Level 2

      • Choose 40 credits from:

        • LAW353 Analysing Crime Data (credits: 20)

          This module does not assume any knowledge of the main data analysis computer package used by criminologists to examine survey data (SPSS).  Students are taught how to enter, clean and check data, and all commands necessary to analyse survey data (frequency, cross-tabulation, correlation, select, count etc.).

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework, lab work)

        • LAW384 Punishment and Penal Policy (credits: 20)

          This module is concerned with the sentencing and punishment of offenders, considering, in historical context: the philosophical underpinnings of punishment; sentencing policy and practice; and the forms that punishment takes (including custodial and non-custodial options), and in particular the rapid growth of the prison population since the mid-1990s.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam)

        • SCS2010 Social Policy and Criminology (credits: 20)

          This module examines responses to crime that do not rely on criminal justice responses of police, courts and prisons. Specifically, the module reviews and appraises social policy responses, including health, housing, education, employment, youth and family as a means of crime reduction.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

    • Level 1

      • Mandatory modules

        • LAW110 Understanding Criminology (credits: 20)

          Introducing criminological definitions, empirical study, theory and the development of criminal justice systems, case studies help students understand how history and theory of criminology can be brought to bear on social and legal issues.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: coursework)

        • LAW3032 Responding to Crime and Victimisation (credits: 20)

          This module looks at key topics in relation to responses to crime and victimisation, exploring policing and prosecution, public responses, crime prevention, restorative justice and victim support. A goal of the module will be to emphasize the interrelatedness of these topics and present them as integrated problems.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

  • Urban Studies

    • Level 3

      • Choose 40 credits from:

        • TRP323 Planning Law and Development Control
          (credits: 20)

          The aims are to (i) develop a knowledge of the legal framework for planning; (ii) develop understanding of development control procedures and policy; and (iii) develop skills in analysing development control problems. The course covers nature and purpose of development control; applications; decisions; redress; enforcement; European directives; design control; effectiveness of development control.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

        • TRP326 Values, Theory and Ethics in Spatial Planning
          (credits: 20)

          This course explores the interrelationships between theoretical debates within spatial planning and everyday practice. The aim is to provide an introduction to the theoretical debates in planning with particular focus on the values and ethical dilemmas underlying spatial planning practice in Britain. It should be noted that the planning activity provides the focus for the course but that the issues and concerns are also linked to the work of other built environment professionals.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

        • TRP331 Development Planning (credits: 20)

          This course gives an overview of the critical task of planning for future development. Much of this work involves making plans and strategies and there will be a focus on these activities during the course of this module. However, it is also vitally important to understand the contexts in which plans are made and implemented, and this module will seek to examine the diverse environments in which plans are made. Part of this task will be achieved through students reflecting on the contexts in which their placements were located. The module considers not only the different forms of plans in the English planning system, but also aims to critically examine some of the key issues facing planners, including organising public involvement in plan-making, seeking consensus between conflicting interests in development and the implementation of policy.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

        • TRP333 Environmental Policy and Governance (credits: 20)

          This unit provides an overview of principal elements of contemporary environmental and nature conservation policy, and institutional frameworks for their delivery. Following an elaboration of key concepts of environmental sustainability and environmental integration, it addresses key issues in policy development and implementation, focusing on the contested and complex nature of the policy environment, and the role of the public and specific interests. The aim is to develop a critical understanding of the opportunities to integrate environmental and nature conservation concerns into policy making. Substantive content includes international and European conventions, policies and instruments; designated areas; and integration in the planning system.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

    • Level 2

      • Choose 40 credits from:

        • TRP210 Urban Design and Place-Making (credits: 20)

          This module provides grounding in the theory and practice of urban design, focusing particularly on conceptual and practical issues in place-making, and arranged into three parts:

          1) environmental issues in site planning,

          2) urban design theory and 3) local planning.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

        • TRP216 Spatial Analysis (credits: 20)

          This module equips students with the knowledge, skills and experience to understand how the analysis of socio-economic datasets can be used to understand planning problems, in particular the application of a broad range of spatial analytical techniques to these data.  Students learn how to use a Geographic Information System (GIS) to produce maps.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

        • TRP217 Profit, Planning and Context (credits: 20)

          This module explores the relationship between the activities of profit-seeking business, the use and development of land and the planning activity, providing an elementary introduction to the economics of land and property development, and exploring how these pressures interact with lifestyle choices to shape the use of land and property and the implication for public planning.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

        • TRP234 Urban Theory and Politics (credits: 20)

          The course is in two parts: Part 1 focuses on the development of urban theory, drawing on explanations of urban growth and change from the 19th C to the present; Part 2 considers the contemporary city economy, urban politics, urban social problems and equal opportunities issues.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

        • TRP235 The Development Process (credits: 20)

          This module explores the interrelationship between planning, design and development profitability, considering the property market, property developers and the property development process, including coverage of market analysis, development appraisal, development finance and the design process.

           (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

    • Level 1

      • Mandatory modules

        • TRP131 The Making of Urban Places (credits: 20)

          The module presents an introduction to the history of urbanisation and the development of systems of town planning, including urban development in Europe up to the present day, as well as American urbanisation and the emergence of past measures to regulate urban development.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: formal exam)

        • TRP133 Development, Planning, and the State (credits: 20)

          The module provides an introduction to state intervention into land and property development and to current planning law and practice.  It considers land-use patterns, the development of state machinery in the 19th century, the British planning system and finally its application to matters of current concern.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

  • Education, Culture and Childhood

    • Level 3

      • Choose 40 credits from:

        • EDU304 Education@Sheffield (credits: 20)

          In Education@Sheffield students are invited to explore and evaluate the rich and diverse research taking place within the School of Education. Through a series of seminars presented by active researchers, students are encouraged to critically engage with research - and the researchers themselves - in the fields of educational and childhood studies. The Education@Sheffield module enables students to acquire a critical understanding of various themes, settings and methodologies which shape contemporary educational research.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

        • EDU306 What is Learning? (credits: 20)

          What is learning? Everyone does it but how does it happen? How can it be influenced? That last question is asked by parents, educators, advertisers, partners, politicians, the media and others. Current understandings about learning are influenced by perspectives from the European Enlightenment of the 18th century and, perhaps surprisingly, from ancient Greece. But there are recent, more radical and challenging perspectives on learning that this module will also explore perspectives that challenge the practices of educators and others and even call into question ideas about truth and reality.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

        • EDU308 Psychological Theory and Childhood Experience
          (credits: 20)

          This module explores the relationship between psychological theory and experience. Students drawn to the study of psychology are presented with a curriculum comprising subjects (memory, perception, language, cognition, development, emotion) they have spent a lifetime experiencing. Hence psychology as a scientific study presents a unique experience for the student, learning what in an experiential sense is already known. This module introduces reflective models of inquiry in which psychological understanding is sought through the exploration of preconceptions transmitted within psychology and psychological education. This module also explores psychological approaches that illuminate different orientations to childhood experience and the implications for these different approaches for the knowledge generated.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

        • EDU309 Globalising Education (credits: 20)

          This module considers the extent to which education might be viewed as a global context with a shared meaning. Moving outwards from the dominant concepts, principles and practices which frame 'our own' national, or regional responses to education, the module explores other possible ways of understanding difference. By examining 'other ways of seeing difference', in unfamiliar contexts, students are able to examine the implications of globalisation for education and explore the opportunities and obstacles for the social justice agendas within a range of cultural settings.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

    • Level 2

      • Choose 40 modules from:

        • EDU205 Children and Digital Cultures (credits: 20)

          This module examines new technologies and associated social practices impacting on children’s lives, considering the nature of new digital practices and how these affect identity, society and culture, and engaging critically with debates within the field of the educational implications of new technologies.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework, presentation)

        • EDU206 Psychology and Learning Communities (credits: 20)

          This module explores learning as an ongoing result of our active participation in social relationships and community, by drawing critical attention to the way in which language facilitates social practices, and aims to challenge notions of learning as an individual enterprise.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

        • EDU207 Dimensions of Education Policy (credits: 20)

          This module introduces students to the study of education policy, its formation and effects, tackling key themes in education policy such as: education and the economy, centralisation/decentralisations, marketisation/privatisation, and policy persuasion and opposition.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

        • EDU209 Being a Teacher (credits: 20)

          This module introduces key issues and roles involved in being a teacher in England, and is suitable for those who definitely want to teach and those who have not yet considered teaching as a career.  It covers early years through to higher education, and deals with issues such as managing challenging behaviour and student assessment.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

    • Level 1

      • Mandatory modules

        • EDU107 Child Psychology (credits: 20)

          This module explores the relationship between psychological theory and educational policy and practice, including cognitive psychology, behaviourism, social and emotional development and references to psychopathologies such as autism and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: coursework)

        • EDU104 Education, Power and Society:

          Introduction to the Sociology of Education (credits: 20)

          This module explores the relationship between educational institutions/cultures/systems and social inequalities, focussing on class, gender, ethnicity and disability, as well as evaluating different policy frameworks and goals.

          (credits: 20)

          (assessment: Formal exam, coursework, online activity)

  • Journalism

    • Level 3

      • Mandatory module

        • JNL317 Introduction to Investigation Journalism (credits: 20)

          This module aims to introduce students to the techniques and methods of investigative journalism. It will discuss procedures for research and for assessing and corroborating information. There will be instruction on searching official databases, interviewing sources and witnesses and applying legislation such as use of the Freedom of Information Act and minimising libel risks. Students will be exposed to case studies and undertake practical exercises in journalism investigation.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Investigative assessment, FOI investigation)

      • Choose 20 credits from:

        • JNL312 Journalism and Political Communication (credits: 20)

          Journalism and Political Communication explores the various ways in which journalists' coverage of political events and processes not merely chronicles the political world but helps constitute and to shape it. Students will examine the debates and controversies surrounding journalism and its relationship with politics. Issues such as news management; party and government advertising; participation and democracy; media reporting of war and conflict; terrorism, and new forms of political engagement will all be critically explored in this module.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

        • JNL315 Free Speech and Censorship (credits: 20)

          The subjects of freedom of speech and censorship have been at the forefront of philosophical and political debate for centuries. For journalists debates about these issues are central to their obligations and role in democratic societies. The module will explore the history and theory of freedom and speech and censorship, framing it in both historical and contemporary contexts relating to the development of journalism and the wider media in Britain.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

    • Level 2

      • Mandatory module

        • JNL206 Ethics, Law and The Media (credits: 20)

          The aim of this module is to develop students’ understanding and knowledge of the basic ethical and legal perspectives relevant to the practice of journalism, tracing the development of press freedom from John Milton through John Locke and John Stuart Mill to the modern day.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: tbc)

      • Choose 40 modules from:

        • JNL218 Web Journalism (credits: 20)

          This module introduces students to online journalism, examining both the theoretical and practical implications of new media for journalism and journalists, and exploring some of the major issues relating to web journalism.  They will learn how to create web pages showing understanding of style and presentational differences between traditional and new media.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework, oral presentation)

        • JNL210 Language and Journalism (credits: 20)

          This module will offer students a critical view of the style, meaning and social implications of the language of journalism, stressing the understanding of journalism as a cultural practice and exploring the linguistic representation of power structures within society as articulated through the news media.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

    • Level 1

      Choose 20 credits from the list on the left and/or 20 credits from the list on the right

      • JNL102

        Journalism Skills (Part One)
        (credits: 20)

        This unit is designed to introduce students to the discipline of news writing and the challenges of producing an accurate, readable narrative.  The lecture programme is supported by practical workshops where students learn to develop their writing skills.

        (credits: 20)

        (assessment: Coursework)

      • JNL112

        Researching and Reporting
        (credits: 20)

        This module is intended to equip students with the understanding, knowledge, insights and skills necessary for effective journalistic research and reporting, combining accurate note taking and effective interviewing set in a local context of authority meetings and community affairs.

        (credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

      • JNL115

        Introducing Journalism Studies
        (credits: 20)

        This self-standing module either provides a basis for further study or serves simply as an introduction to and understanding of journalism.  It introduces key literature in journalism and media studies, focussing on history, organisation and current concerns of the global news media.

        (credits: 20)

        (assessment: Formal exam, coursework, presentation)

      • JNL109 Ethics and Journalism and JNL114 Ethical Issues in Journalism (credits: 10 each)

        JNL109 is a lecture-only module that provides an introduction to ethics in the practice of journalism, including ethical dilemmas, codes of conduct and systems of regulation, covering such issues as privacy, objectivity and the public interest.

        (credits: 10) (assessment: Formal exam)

         

        JNL114 will allow students to explore the main contemporary areas in which journalists face ethical dilemmas, and to consider industry guidelines and codes of practice.  Emphasis will be on discussion of the relationship between ethics and journalism.

        (credits: 10) (assessment: Coursework, presentation)

  • Human Geography

    • Level 2

      • Choose 20 credits from:

        • GEO241 Social and Cultural Geographies  (credits: 20)

          This module builds on GEO112 – ‘Introducing Social and Cultural Geographies’ and is divided into three key thematic/conceptual areas in contemporary social and cultural geographic study:

          1) Culture: landscape, nature;

          2) Identity: Discourse, Practice; 3) Memory: space, history.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework )

        • GEO243 Political Geographies (credits: 20)

          The module introduces students to contemporary debates

          within political geography, discussing political processes

          from international politics, through national politics, local and community politics and individual political behaviour.  Questions

          of power, efficacy and conflict are examines at all these scales.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

    • Level 1

      • Mandatory modules

        • GEO103 Region, Nation and World (credits: 10)

          The first part of this module describes the main elements and key issues involved in the global economic system. In the second part the uneven development process within the global economy is examined. In the third part it is shown how economic activities at the local level are similarly moulded by global influences.

          (credits: 10) (assessment: formal exam)

        • GEO112 Introducing Social and Cultural Geographies (credits: 10)

          An introduction to social and cultural geography focusing on a range of key concepts, current debates and contemporary issues. This module outlines current geographical thinking about space and place; culture and nature; and social exclusion. Drawing examples from around the world, the module explores the contested nature of our social world and conflicting conceptions of our place in nature/culture.

          (credits: 10) (assessment: formal exam)

  • Physical Geography

    • Level 2

      • Choose 20 credits from:

        • GEO206 Environmental Change (credits: 20)

          In this module, methods and techniques to investigate past environmental changes from proxy data are outlined and illustrated, relating to huge changes which have occurred

          in the last 2.6 million years of the earth’s history.

          Problems of distinguishing natural variability from

          that caused by humans are also examined.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

        • GEO233 Glacial Environments (credits: 20)

          This module covers topics relevant to glacial environments of the world, including both contemporary and former ice sheets and glaciers.  It examines how they come into existence, how glaciers work, how they modify the underlying landscape, and the sedimentary products of glaciation.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, lab work)

        • GEO234 Atmospheres and Oceans (credits: 20)

          This module provides an understanding of the global climate, focusing on the atmospheres, the oceans, and their interaction.  The first part considers the climate from the global to the local scale, with the second part examining the physical characteristics of the oceans and their role in the climate system.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

        • GEO244 Earth and Ecosystem Dynamics (credits: 20)

          This module develops understanding of environmental processes, fluxes and interactions across a spectrum of temporal and spatial scales, by adopting an earth system science approach and by considering interactions between the geosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere and biosphere.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

    • Level 1

      • Mandatory modules

        • GEO101 Physical Systems at the Global Scale (credits: 10)

          This course provides an introduction to physical geography, examining four environmental systems using a system-based approach: atmosphere, hydrosphere, geosphere and cryosphere.  The course will also consider the interactions between physical systems as well as changes and consequences of systems change.

          (credits: 10) (assessment: formal exam)

        • GEO108 Earth’s Changing Surface (credits: 10)

          Geomorphology is the science that investigates the landforms of the earth; mountains, valleys, slopes, river beds and dunes. This module introduces the fundamental principles of landscape development, including temporal and spatial scale and equilibrium.

          (credits: 10) (assessment: formal exam)

  • Social Policy

    • Level 2

      • Mandatory module

        • SCS2002 Varieties of Welfare (credits: 20)

          This module locates UK social policy within a wider international context and provides a breadth of study in considering the nature of social problems, the operation of social divisions and the role of the state and other agencies of welfare in responding to these and a range of other social issues in countries around the world.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, assessed presentation)

    • Level 1

      • Mandatory modules

        • SCS1009 Welfare Politics and the State (credits: 10)

          This module introduces students to some of the material and theoretical concerns of social policy as well as considering collective responses to social problems in historical and contemporary context, and the effects of social change on the design and delivery of welfare policies.

          (credits: 10) (assessment: formal exam)

        • SCS1010 Social Problems and Social Policy (credits: 10)

          This module supports its lecture-based sister module through allowing students to consider in depth, some of the material and theoretical concerns of social policy raised by the question “What are social problems and how do societies deal with them?”

          (credits: 10) (assessment: Coursework, portfolio & essays)

  • Sociology

    • Level 2

      • Mandatory module

        • SCS2001 Sociological Theory and Analysis (credits: 20)

          The aim of this module is to build on and develop students' understanding of Sociological theory, beginning with an exploration of the work of modern social theorists such as Talcott Parsons and concluding with a focus on contemporary theorists such as Donna Haraway.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

    • Level 1

      • Mandatory modules

        • SCS1001 The Sociology of Everyday Life (credits: 10)

          This module introduces students to basic sociological concepts such as “the sociological imagination” and “social interaction” and illustrates how they can be applied to everyday life.  A range of everyday life situations, such as shopping, mobile phone use and travel, will be used as examples.

          (credits: 10) (assessment: formal exam)

        • SCS1002 The Sociological Imagination (credits: 10)

          Alongside module SCS1001, students will explore a range of everyday life situations from a sociological perspective, such as mobile phone use, shopping and travel, by reflexively exploring their own experience as well as gathering examples from print and digital media, and doing exercises on specific topics.

          (credits: 10) (assessment: portfolio & 2 pieces)

  • Politics

    • Level 2

      • Choose 20 credits from:

        • POL206 The Politics and Government of the European Union
          (credits: 20)

          This module will provide students with a working knowledge of European integration, and of the main institutions of the European Union, including the Council of Ministers, the Commission and the Parliament. The module consists of a series of lectures on the history and institutions of the European Union, and seminars to discuss issues raised in the lectures.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

        • POL217 The Global Political Economy (credits: 20)

          This module provides an account of the major theoretical traditions which seek to interpret and explain the global political economy, including liberalism and interdependence theory; mercantilism, nationalism and hegemonic stability theory; and Marxism, and ends by reviewing the debate around the meaning of globalisation.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

        • POL223 International Relations Theory (credits: 20)

          This module examines the beginnings of the Discipline and demonstrates how these origins have continued to shape contemporary international relations theory, outlining the key areas of theoretical debate, including Realism, Liberalism, Marxism, Postmodernism, Constructivism, Neorealism, Feminism and Critical Theory.

           (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

        • POL224 Modern Political Thought (credits: 20)

          This module provides an overview of the history of modern political thought (c.1600-1900), by engaging with key philosophical texts from the period and exploring different understandings of the nature of politics and key political concepts contained within them.  A selection of philosophers will be studied.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

        • POL225 New Politics of Latin America (credits: 20)

          This module focuses on the origins, impact, and political consequences of, and responses to, neoliberalism, with reference to the developing world, in particular Latin America.  It will analyse responses to neoliberalism by states and alliances of states, by political parties and social movements, using empirical case studies.

           (credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

        • POL226 Comparative Politics: Citizens, States, Power and Protest
          (credits: 20)

          This module introduces theories and methods of conducting comparative political analysis through an examination of democracy, allowing students with some experience of comparative politics from Level One (POL109) to build on and deepen existing knowledge.  Topics include governance, bureaucracy and the mass media.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

        • POL230 Contemporary Security Challenges (credits: 20)

          This module examines a series of key contemporary challenges to international security, addressing debates about the changing nature of security and analysing some of the causes of conflict and the development of new security threats, and providing students with an informed understanding of current security-related issues.

           (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

        • POL231 Never Mind the Ballots! State and Society in the UK Today
          (credits: 20)

          This module explores changing state-society relationships across the UK, and their impact on government institutions, examining where power resides within the state; how citizens interact with the state; and how the contemporary state should be understood in terms of accountability, legitimacy and governability.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

        • POL232 Contemporary US Foreign Policy (credits: 20)

          An introduction to contemporary US foreign policy, assessing issues such as ‘How is foreign policy made in Washington?’ through some of the primary challenges facing America today: including the War on Terror, climate change, and the re-emergence of a multipolar world order.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

    • Level 1

      • Mandatory module

        • POL113 Introduction to Political Analysis (credits: 20)

          This module provides an introduction to the theories, methods and approaches which shape political analysis, by exploring the relationship between knowledge, its validation and the methods used to collect information, in addition to the language of political analysis.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework, group project - website)

  • Criminology

    • Level 2

      • Choose 20 credits from:

        • LAW353 Analysing Crime Data (credits: 20)

          This module does not assume any knowledge of the main data analysis computer package used by criminologists to examine survey data (SPSS).  Students are taught how to enter, clean and check data, and all commands necessary to analyse survey data (frequency, cross-tabulation, correlation, select, count etc.).

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework, lab work)

        • LAW384 Punishment and Penal Policy (credits: 20)

          This module is concerned with the sentencing and punishment of offenders, considering, in historical context: the philosophical underpinnings of punishment; sentencing policy and practice; and the forms that punishment takes (including custodial and non-custodial options), and in particular the rapid growth of the prison population since the mid-1990s.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam)

        • SCS2010 Social Policy and Criminology (credits: 20)

          This module examines responses to crime that do not rely on criminal justice responses of police, courts and prisons. Specifically, the module reviews and appraises social policy responses, including health, housing, education, employment, youth and family as a means of crime reduction.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Formal exam, coursework)

    • Level 1

      • Mandatory modules

        • LAW110 Understanding Criminology (credits: 20)

          Introducing criminological definitions, empirical study, theory and the development of criminal justice systems, case studies help students understand how history and theory of criminology can be brought to bear on social and legal issues.

           (credits: 20) (assessment: coursework)

  • Urban Studies

    • Level 2

      • Mandatory module

        • TRP210 Urban Design and Place-Making (credits: 20)

          This module provides grounding in the theory and practice of urban design, focusing particularly on conceptual and practical issues in place-making, and arranged into three parts:

           1) environmental issues in site planning,

          2) urban design theory and 3) local planning.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

    • Level 1

      • Mandatory module

        • TRP131 The Making of Urban Places (credits: 20)

          The module presents an introduction to the history of urbanisation and the development of systems of town planning, including urban development in Europe up to the present day, as well as American urbanisation and the emergence of past measures to regulate urban development.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: formal exam)

  • Education, Culture and Childhood

    • Level 2

      • Choose 20 credits from:

        • EDU205 Children and Digital Cultures (credits: 20)

          This module examines new technologies and associated social practices impacting on children’s lives, considering the nature of new digital practices and how these affect identity, society and culture, and engaging critically with debates within the field of the educational implications of new technologies.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework, presentation)

        • EDU206 Psychology and Learning Communities (credits: 20)

          This module explores learning as an ongoing result of our active participation in social relationships and community, by drawing critical attention to the way in which language facilitates social practices, and aims to challenge notions of learning as an individual enterprise.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

        • EDU207 Dimensions of Education Policy (credits: 20)

          This module introduces students to the study of education policy, its formation and effects, tackling key themes in education policy such as: education and the economy, centralisation/decentralisations, marketisation/privatisation, and policy persuasion and opposition.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

    • Level 1

      • Mandatory module

        • EDU107 Child Psychology (credits: 20)

          This module explores the relationship between psychological theory and educational policy and practice, including cognitive psychology, behaviourism, social and emotional development and references to psychopathologies such as autism and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: coursework)

  • Journalism

    • Level 2

      • Choose 20 credits from:

        • JNL206 Ethics, Law and The Media (credits: 20)

          The aim of this module is to develop students’ understanding and knowledge of the basic ethical and legal perspectives relevant to the practice of journalism, tracing the development of press freedom from John Milton through John Locke and John Stuart Mill to the modern day.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: tbc)

        • JNL210 Language and Journalism (credits: 20)

          This module will offer students a critical view of the style, meaning and social implications of the language of journalism, stressing the understanding of journalism as a cultural practice and exploring the linguistic representation of power structures within society as articulated through the news media.

          (credits: 20) (assessment: Coursework)

    • Level 1

      • Choose 20 credits from:

        • JNL115 Introducing Journalism Studies (credits: 20)

          This self-standing module either provides a basis for further study or serves simply as an introduction to and understanding of journalism.  It introduces key literature in journalism and media studies, focussing on history, organisation and current concerns of the global news media.

          (credits: 20)

          (assessment: Formal exam, coursework, presentation)

        • JNL109 Ethics and Journalism

          and JNL114 Ethical Issues in Journalism (credits: 10 each)

          JNL109 is a lecture-only module that provides an introduction to ethics in the practice of journalism, including ethical dilemmas, codes of conduct and systems of regulation, covering such issues as privacy, objectivity and the public interest.

          (credits: 10) (assessment: Formal exam)

           

          JNL114 will allow students to explore the main contemporary areas in which journalists face ethical dilemmas, and to consider industry guidelines and codes of practice.  Emphasis will be on discussion of the relationship between ethics and journalism.

          (credits: 10) (assessment: Coursework, presentation)

On top of the two subject choices above, you also have an additional 2 x 20 credits which you can use by choosing a third and fourth subject from either the major or minor lists above.  Alternatively, you can use one of those 20 credits to choose a module from any department across the University. You will make these choices once you arrive, so don't worry about them for now.

DISCLAIMER

The SMI reserves the right to cancel or make adjustments to the specifications and availability of particular modules as necessary, and cannot guarantee to avoid timetable clashes for individual students.

 

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